argumentative

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Argumentative

Controversial; subject to argument.

Pleading in which a point relied upon is not set out, but merely implied, is often labeled argumentative. Pleading that contains arguments that should be saved for trial, in addition to allegations establishing a Cause of Action or defense, is also called argumentative.

argumentative

adjective belligerent, characterized by argument, combative, contentious, dialectical, disputatious, dissentient, eristic, eristical, factious, given to controversy, litigious, logomachic, logomachical, petulant, pilpulistic, polemic, polemical, pugnacious, quarrelsome
Associated concepts: argumentative denial
See also: analytical, contentious, discursive, disputable, dissenting, forensic, hostile, insistent, litigable, litigious, negative, petulant, polemic, pugnacious, remonstrative
References in periodicals archive ?
In any argumentation, it is undeniable that "I" and "you" are persons, that "we" (the arguers) ought to respect one another as free and equal persons relative to one another, and that "we" ought to settle "our" differences by argumentation or argumentatively defensible methods.
Common Core standards included reading, research, and synthesizing data as well as writing argumentatively, says Jami D.
Sustaining my claim argumentatively is, however, a trickier matter, requiring at some level a theory of critical error.
Yeah right, a wild fox that tamely wanders into camp, right onto our doorstep no less, and who doesn't eat chipmunks," I said, as argumentatively as I could.
So he shows that the other party's argument is correct but argumentatively beside the point, it has not succeeded in deflecting him from his view.
He says he can't remember, but claims it would have been in his character to just banter argumentatively with a "radical feminist".
A car mechanic said argumentatively to his client, a cardiac surgeon: "So Doc, look at this work.
Insisting that it is not possible to embark on a critical reconstruction of the Christian doctrine without exposing and determining the truth question, (45) Pannenberg invokes the authority of Johann Franz Buddeus (1727) who cited two conditions that systematic theology, then a newly emerging 18th-century term, must meet: it must deal with its subject matter comprehensively and explain, prove, and confirm its content, which, for Pannenberg, shows that systematic theology argumentatively (not catechetically) presents Christian doctrine in ways that involve its truth and the ascertainment of that truth.
Argumentatively, it then focuses on Wittgenstein's later conception of the nature of discursive thinking.
According to Gorden, Infante, and Graham, (1988) "receptivity is important in the perception that one's superior encourages argument, likes to examine issues argumentatively, and is not likely to attack verbally the self-worth of someone who disputes a point.
1988) receptivity is important in "the perception that one's superior encourages argument, likes to examine issues argumentatively, and is not likely to attack verbally the self-worth of someone who disputes a point" (p.
A clear disadvantage with this approach, however, is that it fails argumentatively with those who take negative rights to be fundamental and who derive all other rights from those fundamental negative rights.