artificial

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artificial

adjective adulterine, artificiosus, assumed, casuistic, concocted, deceptive, ersatz, faked, false, feigned, fictitious, forged, illusory, imaginary, imagined, imitation, imitative, man-made, not natural, simulated, simulative, spurious, superficial, ungenuine, unnatural, unreal
Associated concepts: artificial boundaries, artificial ingrediints, artificial monuments, artificial person, artificial pond, artificial presumption, artificial watercourse
See also: bogus, deceptive, disingenuous, false, fictitious, histrionic, imitation, inflated, meretricious, orotund, pretentious, specious, spurious, synthetic

ARTIFICIAL. What is the result of, or relates to, the arts; opposed to natural; thus we say a corporation is an artificial person, in opposition to a natural person. Artificial accession is the uniting one property to another by art, opposed to a simple natural union. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 503.

References in periodicals archive ?
There is indirect evidence to suggest that sugar sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks might affect the term delivery because both high blood glucose concentrations and low dose methanol exposure have been linked to a shorter duration of gestation.
The system described in the coffee-shop scenario is totally interactive and artificially intelligent and can be classified as a true fourth generation automation system.
The Complaint alleges that NeoPharm and certain of its directors and officers violated Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder, by issuing a series of material misrepresentations to the market during the Class Period, thereby artificially inflating the price of NeoPharm common stock Hospital Bonds.
The complaint alleges that during the Class Period, defendants caused Lantronix's shares to trade at artificially inflated levels through the issuance of false and misleading financial statements.
The Complaint charges Universal Access and certain of its officers and directors with issuing a series of material misrepresentations to the market during the class period, failing to adequately disclose a change in the company's business model and the risks involved in that change, and issuing financial statements that violated Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ("GAAP"), thereby artificially inflating the price of Universal Access's publicly traded securities.
The complaint alleges that defendants violated Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder, by issuing a series of material misrepresentations to the market between June 9, 1999 through November 20, 2001, thereby artificially inflating the market price of the Company's common stock.
The complaint alleges that JDS Uniphase, with the acquiescence of its auditors Ernst & Young, LLP, violated the federal securities laws by failing to disclose that JDS Uniphase's earnings were artificially inflated due to JDS Uniphase's failure to record write-downs of goodwill and other intangible assets associated with the mergers between Uniphase Corp.
Plaintiff alleges that during the period of April 25, 2001 to December 21, 2001 inclusive (the "Class Period") Defendants issued a series of material misrepresentations to the market in press releases and SEC filings thereby artificially inflating the price of Homestore securities.
The complaint alleges that the foregoing misstatements and omissions of material facts in violation of the federal securities laws had the effect of artificially inflating Global Crossing's share price.
To receive the allocations at the IPO price, the underwriters' brokerage customers had to agree to purchase additional shares in the aftermarket at progressively higher prices (a practice known on Wall Street as "laddering"); which was intended to (and did) drive Intraware's share price up to artificially high levels.
Our complaint alleges that Art Technology, and certain of its officers and directors, violated federal securities laws by issuing materially false and misleading statements during the Class Period that had the effect of artificially inflating the market price of the Company's securities.
To receive the allocations at the IPO price, the underwriters ' brokerage customers had to agree to purchase additional shares in the aftermarket at progressively higher prices (a practice known on Wall Street as "laddering"); which was intended to (and did) drive UTStarcom's share price up to artificially high levels.