mating

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Studying individual marriage decisions has broader implications for assortative mating and equilibrium in the marriage market.
The [chi square] Goodness of fit test provided no evidence contradicting like-with-like or assortative mating, whether considering only grebes with platforms and pairs having offspring or including displaying pairs and grebes in twos that seemed paired.
Our results provide broad support for the hypothesis of positive assortative mating with respect to earnings.
Thus, whether due to differences in latitudes of wintering ranges, different departure dates, or different rates of migration, timing of northbound (herein referred to as "spring") migration could represent one factor influencing negative assortative mating in this species.
34, suggesting that assortative mating by education played little, if any, role in income inequality.
Finally, 40%-60% of caregivers qualify for a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder; as with depression, the nonbiological relatives were more symptomatic than were the blood relatives, lending support to the theory of assortative mating.
Finally, 40%-60%-of caregivers qualify for a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder; as with depression, the nonbiological relatives were more symptomatic than were the blood relatives, lending support to the theory of assortative mating.
The coming together of Constance and Oscar was an indubitable case of socially assortative mating.
Murray argues that the main engine of class segregation has been "homogamy" or assortative mating driven by increased education.
Unmarried parents tend to be of lower socioeconomic standing, face poorer prospects in the marriage market, and have lower incentives for assortative mating (Brown 2004; Garfinkel, Glei, and McLanahan, 2002; Rosenzweig, 1999).
Among the topics are institutions and the beginnings of economic growth in 18th-century Britain, the coevolution of institutions and preferences, politics and income distribution, income distribution and the interaction between cycles and growth, the effects of bureaucrats' rent-seeking activity on market failures within poor institutions, evidence from Greek regions on the role of human capital in economic growth, adult longevity and economic take-off from Malthus to Ben-Prath, exploring assortative mating among the bright and wealthy, and interaction between economic and social variables.