attribute

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97) Once a possibility in which the proposition is false has been brought to the attention of the attributor, then, so long as that context persists, an attribution of knowledge that the subject knows the proposition will be false.
Shortly in addition they serve to state the accordance (or discrepancy) between the subjective propositional attitudes of the subject and the propositional attitudes of the attributor.
Factitious virtue is generated in part by the actions and expectations of the attributor.
The improvement reflects increased revenues, partially offset by slightly higher operating expenses as a result of the company's recent acquisition of Attributor Corporation in December 2012.
Tablets and e-readers raise an issue that the book industry is grappling with," says Matt Robinson, president and COO of Attributor.
If poachers persist, Attributor invokes provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that give a publisher the right to tell banner-ad services to stop feeding ads to copyright violators and to tell search engines to stop linking to unauthorized articles.
said it has begun joint services in Japan with Attributor Inc.
For personal control, the attributor indicates that he or she either can or cannot personally control the outcome of the event.
This simulation process works for decision making, emotion, sensation, and any other type of mental state the attributor himself can experience.
As Kelley (1971) stated, "The attributor is not simply an attributor, a seeker after knowledge; his latent goal in attaining knowledge is that of effective management of himself and his environment (p.
Our discovery that Chalmers was an unreliable attributor does not, however, mean that he had no impact on his contemporaries and immediate
Anonymity of clients can be ensured with the client attributor code often constructed on the basis of date of birth, initials at birth, and gender.