attunement


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However, given the likelihood that change agency will disturb comfort zones and evoke the sense of the world as threatening, leaders are inevitably wounded in the process, which can also engender their pervasive affective attunement to the world as a place of threat.
There was sense of attunement between the nurse and patient, which was key in setting the rhythm for the patient's plan of care.
Sadly, the most effective treatment is one that seems almost impossible to carry out: the monitoring of mother-infant attunement in the first 18 months of life.
Haralson productively highlights the reader's attunement to "protogay" language, gesture, and signification (29) by citing "an appreciable fund of circumstantial evidence [that] has accrued from gay readers of Henry James" (E.
of attunement, his 'sober coldness' as Levinas calls it,
Most counselor education programs more than adequately prepare school counseling graduate students to perform individual and group counseling and to experience and process empathy and attunement to others.
RELATED ARTICLE: Couple Attachment as Physiological Attunement
All of the stories are enthralling in themselves, and they are written with complete attunement to the style of the age and their genre.
Given that Nader's daughter and Nieshoff are quadriplegic, the center's vision reflects an important attunement to the SCI community, which, in turn, translates into an open-minded receptivity to innovative therapeutic approaches.
Understanding is achieved by a correspondence of meaning between individuals beginning with a mutual attunement to a "common sense" of the world and of language first of all.
Learning from attunement includes the ability to immerse oneself in the experience of others, and the process of accommodation, which is the free art of accommodating one's beliefs and language to another (Mackoff & Wenet, 2001).
Learning from attunement includes the ability to immerse oneself in the experience of others, and the process of accommodation, which is the fine art of accommodating one's beliefs and language to another (Mackoff & Wenet, 2001).