References in classic literature ?
She had been jealous of her at college, where she had esteemed herself the better bred of the two; but that opinion had hardly consoled her for Agatha's superior quickness of wit, dexterity of hand, audacity, aptness of resource, capacity for forming or following intricate associations of ideas, and consequent power to dazzle others.
She had the audacity to reply that she could not see either him or his brother.
The princess, who realized the consequences of such audacity, entreated me not to touch the talisman.
One company of unusual impertinence, without money or patents, had capitalized its audacity at $15,000,000.
Happily the human mind is so constituted that no party can reach to the audacity of doing this.
But these freaks of his guest were not much to the liking of the landlord, so he determined to cut matters short and confer upon him at once the unlucky order of knighthood before any further misadventure could occur; so, going up to him, he apologised for the rudeness which, without his knowledge, had been offered to him by these low people, who, however, had been well punished for their audacity.
His irony, his superiority, his audacity, 'regarding not the person of man,' necessarily flow out of the loftiness of his situation.
He was an authority on the stage, skilful on the ice or the links with skate or golf-club; he dressed with nice audacity, and, to put the finishing touch upon his glory, he kept a gig and a strong trotting-horse.
Skill, coolness, audacity, and cunning he possessed in a superior degree, and it must be a cunning whale to escape the stroke of his harpoon.
It was Passepartout who, playing his part with a happy audacity, had passed through the crowd amid the general terror.
de Treville, as he has ended by styling himself in Paris, had really commenced life as D'Artagnan now did; that is to say, without a sou in his pocket, but with a fund of audacity, shrewdness, and intelligence which makes the poorest Gascon gentleman often derive more in his hope from the paternal inheritance than the richest Perigordian or Berrichan gentleman derives in reality from his.
She is, therefore, always, woman-like, a lover of young men, because they are less cautious, more violent, and with more audacity command her.