author

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Related to authorships: authored

author

(Originator), noun architect, auctor, begetter, causer, composer, contriver, creator, deviser, discoverer, effecter, fabricator, founder, generator, inaugurator, initiator, innovater, institutor, introducer, inventor, maker, manufacturer, occasioner, organizer, parent, prime mover, producer, sire
Associated concepts: copyright
Foreign phrases: Culpa tenet suos auctores.Fault binds its own authors.

author

(Writer), noun compiler, composer of a literrry work, drafter, essayist, literary person, man of letters, person who writes, scriptor, verse maker
Associated concepts: copyright, plagiarism
See also: architect, compose, derivation, elicit, engender, generate, invent, make, maker, originate, undersigned
References in periodicals archive ?
Honorary and ghost authorship appears to be an issue in the profession of nursing.
Authorship and the Films of David Lynch: Aesthetic Receptions of Contemporary Hollywood
Although the only way to get published in better journals, presumably, is to do superior research and present it well, less honorable options may be used to influence publication counts and author order on manuscripts, such as using status and power to obtain authorship credit or deny it to others (Arthur et al.
It turned out that 6 of the 7 questions were about authorship criteria, and each question related to a specific circumstance that the questioner had encountered or was currently encountering.
4] found that the inclusion of undeserved authorships correlated with the number of coauthors listed, not present in papers with only 2 authors, but occurring progressively thereafter.
Gift" authorships are intellectually dishonest, deceptive, and cause dilution of credit for the research endeavor.
To broaden instructors' understandings of possibilities for the relatively peaceful coexistence of individual and collaborative authorship and the always-existing pull between them, it offers an overview of authorship history.
And if we consider some texts, some readers, and some settings more likely than others to produce the sense of an author-as-persona and others more likely to produce the sense of an impersonal structure at work, we might be freed to begin asking when and how readers are likely to construct, or to believe in, these different authorships.
These unethical authorships can occur when a legitimate author overgenerously grants coauthorship to a peer, to someone senior to them, to an academic or administrative supervisor, or to a friend.
This calls for authorship and its responsibilities.