avails


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.
References in classic literature ?
But to his mother Mary, when she saw Others returned from baptism, not her Son, Nor left at Jordan tidings of him none, Within her breast though calm, her breast though pure, Motherly cares and fears got head, and raised Some troubled thoughts, which she in sighs thus clad:-- "Oh, what avails me now that honour high, To have conceived of God, or that salute, 'Hail, highly favoured, among women blest
Or what avails a curse or blessing from a man like you?
The genius of a Colbert or of a Sully avails nothing, unless it is supported by the energetic will that makes a Napoleon or a Cromwell.
What avails it that you are Christian, if you are not purer than the heathen, if you deny yourself no more, if you are not more religious?
Zarathustra and the spiritually conscientious one join issue at the end on the question of the proper place of "fear" in man's history, and Nietzsche avails himself of the opportunity in order to restate his views concerning the relation of courage to humanity.
What avails it to me that you do not reproach me, if I so bitterly reproach myself
My wife, who was present, scoffed at my compassion, which made her malice of no avail.
Afterwards when I wished to descend to the more particular, so many diverse objects presented themselves to me, that I believed it to be impossible for the human mind to distinguish the forms or species of bodies that are upon the earth, from an infinity of others which might have been, if it had pleased God to place them there, or consequently to apply them to our use, unless we rise to causes through their effects, and avail ourselves of many particular experiments.
One government can collect and avail itself of the talents and experience of the ablest men, in whatever part of the Union they may be found.
No 'delicate micrometer' -- as has been suggested by one too hasty Spaceland critic -- would in the least avail us; for we should not know WHAT TO MEASURE, NOR IN WHAT DIRECTION.
The Pereire, of the French Transatlantic Company, whose admirable steamers are equal to any in speed and comfort, did not leave until the 14th; the Hamburg boats did not go directly to Liverpool or London, but to Havre; and the additional trip from Havre to Southampton would render Phileas Fogg's last efforts of no avail.
Therefore it is necessary for a prince to understand how to avail himself of the beast and the man.