barrenness


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BARRENNESS. The incapacity to produce a child. This, when arising from impotence, is a cause for dissolving a marriage. 1 Fodere, Med. Leg. Sec. 254.

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This mood of defeatism is intensified by the preponderance of images of barrenness and death throughout the novel.
In that film Antonioni also uses the barrenness of the island and the sea in a similar way--it functions as narrative commentary, speaking what the characters cannot voice.
This comment on barrenness is a far cry from the savagery of his exhibition held in 1975 in Paris at the blusee des Arts Decoratifs and entitled `Homage to Mies van der Rohe'.
We near the prospect of turning the wet abundant life of this planet, our home, into ravaged barrenness that can sustain only death.
There's a certain barrenness in understanding freedom as choice.
That so many opinion makers attempt to explain such acts as stemming from a lack of economic opportunity exposes the utter barrenness of conventional poverty analysis.
The barrenness of the land was matched only by the confusion of those around me.
I had particular cause to remember; I had entered her house in my teens, not long after her death, and its barrenness and sorrow had entered me like an arrow.
And Rachel, Jacob's childless wife, presumably wanted her sister's mandrakes to cure her barrenness.
EXTRACT OF THE PAUPER'S FUNERAL, BY ROBERT SOUTHEY Haunted by Poverty and woe-begone, Unloved, unfriended, thou didst journey on: Thy youth in ignorance and labour past, And thine old age all barrenness and blast
Faith in the new life that comes with the birth, death and resurrection of our Lord and that abides in spite of the barrenness of the human spirit is like the commitment of hope that the barren woman gives to her womb.
Barrenness and blessing; Abraham, Sarah and the journey of faith.