bastardy


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See: bar sinister

BASTARDY, crim. law. The offence of begetting a bastard child.

BASTARDY, persons. The state or condition of a bastard. The law presumes every child legitimate, when born of a woman in a state of wedlock, and casts the onus probandi (q. v.) on the party who affirms the bastardy. Stark. Ev. h. t.

References in periodicals archive ?
I believe that these intestate succession statutes that require a father to take formal steps to acknowledge or legitimize a child before that child can legally inherit from him are remnants of the days of slavery and anti-miscegenation laws, when "fictions and presumptions about bastardy and marriage served definite purposes in a legal system seeking easy ways to determine who was eligible to inherit property.
About Ada Santiago and James Pynes: "Owing to the age of the said Ada Santiago, we cannot proceed against Pynes for Statutory Rape, Seduction or Contributing to the Delinquency and Dependency of a Minor; as the legal relation of Parent and Child does not exist between Pynes and the child, we cannot proceed against him for Non-Support of Child; and as we have no Bastardy law in Arizona, he cannot be proceeded along this line.
Bastardy and paternity charges comprise only a fraction of these trials: Some 162 women were charged with conceiving illegitimate children in this period, and 142 men were charged with fathering those same children.
Common law in the American colonies incorporated many provisions of the English law of bastardy but gradually modified them during the nineteenth and especially the twentieth centuries.
She was reviled for her sins--a dispatch from London to an American paper read, "It is a case of glaring, flagrant harlotry and bastardy, taken into the pure homes of English wives and daughters, and condoned by the men because she is so beautiful, so fascinating.
It was a tribute to Henry's overwhelming personal authority that the tacit contradiction between his daughters' bastardy (which had been enshrined in statute law in the 1530s) and their standing as his heirs was not challenged in his lifetime.
Bastardy, impotence, lack of physical strength in a physical world.
Nausea opens with a series of these illness-inducing discoveries by means of which the protagonist is confronted with bastardy and the overwhelming absurdity of being.
They are found in the Warwickshire Poor Law Index containing 35,000 names covering apprenticeship indentures, bastardy orders, settlement and removal papers.
Michel Contat and Michel Rybalka go as far as to say that this play, with its themes of bastardy, "loser wins" the search for the absolute in Evil, and self-conquest, is "a dramatic illustration" of Saint Genet.
It was a time in which women of all classes exercised their sexual autonomy, confronting men openly in divorce and bastardy cases and even engaging in prostitution.
According to Andrew Blaikie, two aspects of the "regional bastardy indices" jolted bourgeois complacency.