be cautious

References in classic literature ?
Surely, a woman is bound to be cautious and listen to those who know the world better than she does.
Wise politicians will be cautious about fettering the government with restrictions that cannot be observed, because they know that every breach of the fundamental laws, though dictated by necessity, impairs that sacred reverence which ought to be maintained in the breast of rulers towards the constitution of a country, and forms a precedent for other breaches where the same plea of necessity does not exist at all, or is less urgent and palpable.
I bid her be cautious lest she got a fall, and she nimbly disappeared.
Now, Betts Shoreham and Mademoiselle Hennequin had made great progress toward an understanding in the course of this week, though the lady becoming more and more conscious of the interest she had created in the heart of the gentleman, her own conduct got to be cautious and reserved.
If we don't know much about what will happen in the future--and I agree with Litterman that we don't--then we should be cautious.
You try to live your life the best you can and just be cautious about the people around you.
Curtis feels she's coming out as a politically involved member of the gay community when many gays and lesbians, particularly those who work in creative fields, are pressured to be cautious.
Q WHERE can I invest some money where I can be cautious now but take advantage when markets recover?
We must be cautious because of the market--these expansions have to afford us a lower cost product somehow.
Best believes that the market competition in the auto direct sales will remain intense, and insurers need to be cautious about entering the market without forgoing profitability.
Despite Ortiz's optimism, the Angels say they will be cautious with him.
Best believes that the market competition in auto direct sales will remain intense, and insurers need to be cautious about entering the market without forgoing profitability.