behaviour


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behaviour

(establishing the ground of divorce) the ground of divorce, irretrievable breakdown, is established by this mode, in English and in Scots law, if the defender has at any time during the marriage behaved (whether or not as a result of mental abnormality and whether such behaviour has been active or passive) so that the pursuer cannot reasonably be expected to cohabit with the defender. Courts look at the whole circumstances and often seek a pattern of behaviour in which older incidents are highly relevant. A single incident, however, can constitute behaviour if it strikes at the heart of the marital bond.

BEHAVIOUR. In old English, haviour without the prefix be. It is the manner of having, holding, or keeping one's self or the carriage of one's self with respect to propriety, morals, and the requirements of law. Surety to be of - good behaviour is a larger requirement than surety to keep the peace. Dalton, c. 122; 4 Burn's J. 355.

References in classic literature ?
The behaviour of the young colt and foal appeared very modest, and that of the master and mistress extremely cheerful and complaisant to their guest.
This occasioned farther talk; and I saw the company was pleased with my behaviour, whereof I soon found the good effects.
Collins, after assuring them that he bore his young cousin no ill-will, and should never resent her behaviour as any affront, seated himself at another table with Mr.
I think I can mean only one thing: the enemy to behaviour.
But he lacked chivalry; his thoughts, like his behaviour, would not be modified by awe.
Though his looks did not please her, his name was a passport to her goodwill, and she thought with sincere compassion of his approaching disappointment; for, in spite of what she had believed herself to overhear in the pump-room, his behaviour was so incompatible with a knowledge of Isabella's engagement that she could not, upon reflection, imagine him aware of it.
So the Jay could do no better than go back to the other Jays, who had watched his behaviour from a distance; but they were equally annoyed with him, and told him:
This behaviour of Mrs Bridget greatly surprised Mrs Deborah; for this well-bred woman seldom opened her lips, either to her master or his sister, till she had first sounded their inclinations, with which her sentiments were always consonant.
Those who desired to investigate such questions were led to observe the behaviour of animals, in the hope that their behaviour would throw some light on their mental faculties.