bequeath


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Related to bequeath: bequest

Bequeath

To dispose of Personal Property owned by a decedent at the time of death as a gift under the provisions of the decedent's will.The term bequeath applies only to personal property. A testator, to give real property to someone in a testamentary provision, devises it. Bequeath is sometimes used as a synonym for devise.

bequeath

v. to give personal property under provisions of a will (as distinct from "devise" which is to give real estate). 2) the act of giving any asset by the terms of a will. (See: will, bequest)

bequeath

verb administer to, afford, allow, assign dower, bestow upon, cede, change hands, contribute, deeiver to, demise, devise, devolve upon, dispense, dispose of, distribute, donate, endow with, enfeoff, furnish, give, give away at death, give by will, grant, hand down, hand on, hand over to, interchange, invest, leave, leave a legacy, leave by will, leave to, make a bequest, make a present of, make legaaies, pass on to, pass over to, provide, put in possession, remit, render, transfer ownership, vest in, will to
Associated concepts: bequest
Foreign phrases: Da tua dum tua sunt, post mortem tunc tua non sunt.Give that which is yours while it is yours, after death it is not yours.
See also: abalienate, advance, bestow, cede, contribute, convey, demise, descend, devise, devolve, endow, give, grant, leave, pass, present, supply, transfer

bequeath

to dispose of property by will.

TO BEQUEATH. To give personal property by will to another.

References in classic literature ?
ngle in the second; which treasure I bequeath and leave en.
Three girls, the two eldest sixteen and fourteen, was an awful legacy for a mother to bequeath, an awful charge rather, to confide to the authority and guidance of a conceited, silly father.
But, father, remember that I need not leave you; we shall be two to love you; you will learn to know the man to whose care you bequeath me.
For he made it infamous for any one either to buy or sell their possessions, in which he did right; but he permitted any one that chose it to give them away, or bequeath them, although nearly the same consequences will arise from one practice as from the other.
Each morning was like the one that had preceded it; noon poured down the same exhaustless rays, and night condensed in its shadow the scattered heat which the ensuing day would again bequeath to the succeeding night.
As for my skeleton, I bequeath it to the Medical Academy for the benefit of science.
Thank God, we made it all up the last time I saw him, and he told me then, that if he was forced to leave her he should bequeath his little girl to me as a token of his love.
Now, here's an axiom which I bequeath to this bureau and to all bureaus: Where the clerk ends, the functionary begins; where the functionary ends, the statesman rises.
Miss La Creevy had got up early to put a fancy nose into a miniature of an ugly little boy, destined for his grandmother in the country, who was expected to bequeath him property if he was like the family.
So he had grown rich at last, and thought to transmit to his only son all the cut-and-dried experience which he himself had purchased at the price of his lost illusions; a noble last illusion of age which fondly seeks to bequeath its virtues and its wary prudence to heedless youth, intent only on the enjoyment of the enchanted life that lies before it.