bequeath

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Bequeath

To dispose of Personal Property owned by a decedent at the time of death as a gift under the provisions of the decedent's will.The term bequeath applies only to personal property. A testator, to give real property to someone in a testamentary provision, devises it. Bequeath is sometimes used as a synonym for devise.

bequeath

v. to give personal property under provisions of a will (as distinct from "devise" which is to give real estate). 2) the act of giving any asset by the terms of a will. (See: will, bequest)

bequeath

verb administer to, afford, allow, assign dower, bestow upon, cede, change hands, contribute, deeiver to, demise, devise, devolve upon, dispense, dispose of, distribute, donate, endow with, enfeoff, furnish, give, give away at death, give by will, grant, hand down, hand on, hand over to, interchange, invest, leave, leave a legacy, leave by will, leave to, make a bequest, make a present of, make legaaies, pass on to, pass over to, provide, put in possession, remit, render, transfer ownership, vest in, will to
Associated concepts: bequest
Foreign phrases: Da tua dum tua sunt, post mortem tunc tua non sunt.Give that which is yours while it is yours, after death it is not yours.
See also: abalienate, advance, bestow, cede, contribute, convey, demise, descend, devise, devolve, endow, give, grant, leave, pass, present, supply, transfer

bequeath

to dispose of property by will.

TO BEQUEATH. To give personal property by will to another.

References in classic literature ?
The whole residue of my estate, after payment of my burial expenses and my lawful debts, I give and bequeath to Rear-Admiral Arthur Everard Bartram, my Executor aforesaid; to be by him applied to such uses as he may think fit.
But the inheritance consisted in this only, a scrap of paper on which Spada had written: -- `I bequeath to my beloved nephew my coffers, my books, and, amongst others, my breviary with the gold corners, which I beg he will preserve in remembrance of his affectionate uncle.
Three girls, the two eldest sixteen and fourteen, was an awful legacy for a mother to bequeath, an awful charge rather, to confide to the authority and guidance of a conceited, silly father.
For he made it infamous for any one either to buy or sell their possessions, in which he did right; but he permitted any one that chose it to give them away, or bequeath them, although nearly the same consequences will arise from one practice as from the other.