References in classic literature ?
But I'll truly try to be better, so he mayn't be disappointed in me by-and-by.
I should say," said Ginger, curling her nostril, "that these men, who are so wise, had better give orders that in the future all foals should be born with their eyes set just in the middle of their foreheads, instead of on the side; they always think they can improve upon nature and mend what God has made.
Is it not--forgive me; I have begun the question on my lips--a pity to live no better life?
It will be enough for him to he in the stable," said Sancho, "for neither he nor I are worthy to rest a moment in the apple of your highness's eye, and I'd as soon stab myself as consent to it; for though my master says that in civilities it is better to lose by a card too many than a card too few, when it comes to civilities to asses we must mind what we are about and keep within due bounds.
So defend yourself and see that you prove the better man.
It hardly becomes so young a man as I am to talk much about farming to you, who are most of you so much older, and are men of experience; still, I have interested myself a good deal in such matters, and learned as much about them as my opportunities have allowed; and when the course of events shall place the estate in my hands, it will be my first desire to afford my tenants all the encouragement a landlord can give them, in improving their land and trying to bring about a better practice of husbandry.
Parliamentary history has few better passages than the debate in which Burke and Fox separated in the House of Commons; when Fox urged on his old friend the claims of old friendship with such tenderness that the house was moved to tears.
But Good still persevered, saying, with an approach to cheerfulness, that it was better than doing nothing.
Nay," answered the stranger, "then stand back shine own self, for the better man, I wet, am I.
But now he may be no better than a Dissenter, and want to push aside my son on pretence of doctrine.
If we are going to the opera to-night, perhaps we 'd better start, as the carriage has been waiting some time," observed Fan coolly, and sailed out of the room in an unusually lofty manner.
Well, you needn't preach; you didn't any of you do any more, and you might have, for Mac likes you better than he does me.

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