bias


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Bias

A predisposition or a preconceived opinion that prevents a person from impartially evaluating facts that have been presented for determination; a prejudice.

A judge who demonstrates bias in a hearing over which he or she presides has a mental attitude toward a party to the litigation that hinders the judge from supervising fairly the course of the trial, thereby depriving the party of the right to a fair trial. A judge may Recuse himself or herself to avoid the appearance of bias.

If, during the Voir Dire, a prospective juror indicates bias toward either party in a lawsuit, the juror can be successfully challenged for cause and denied a seat on the jury.

bias

n. the predisposition of a judge, arbitrator, prospective juror, or anyone making a judicial decision, against or in favor of one of the parties or a class of persons. This can be shown by remarks, decisions contrary to fact, reason or law, or other unfair conduct. Bias can be toward an ethnic group, homosexuals, women or men, defendants or plaintiffs, large corporations, or local parties. Getting a "hometown" decision is a form of bias which is the bane of the out-of-town lawyer. There is also the subtle bias of some male judges in favor of pretty women. Obvious bias is a ground for reversal on appeal, but it is hard to prove, since judges are usually careful to display apparent fairness in their comments. The possibility of juror bias is explored in questioning at the beginning of trial in a questioning process called "voir dire." (See: voir dire, hometowned)

bias

noun bigotry, disinclination, disposition, foregone conclusion, inclinatio, inclination, jaundice, partiality, partisanism, partisanship, preapprehension, preconceived idea, preconception, predetermination, predilection, predisposition, preference, prejudgment, prejudication, prejudice, prenotion, proclivity, proneness, propensio animi, propensity, susceptibility, trend, undetachment
Associated concepts: actual bias, bias of mind
See also: bait, choice, discrimination, dispose, disposition, favor, favoritism, inclination, inequality, inequity, influence, injustice, intolerance, lure, nepotism, partiality, penchant, point of view, position, preconception, predetermination, predilection, predisposition, preference, prejudice, proclivity, propensity, slant, stand, tendency

BIAS. A particular influential power which sways the judgment; the inclination or propensity of the mind towards a particular object.
     2. Justice requires that the judge should have no bias for or against any individual; and that his mind should be perfectly free to act as the law requires.
     3. There is, however, one kind of bias which the courts suffer to influence them in their judgments it is a bias favorable to a class of cases, or persons, as distinguished from an individual case or person. A few examples will explain this. A bias is felt on account of convenience. 1 Ves. sen. 13, 14; 3 Atk. 524. It is also felt in favor of the heir at law, as when there is an heir on one side and a mere volunteer on the other. Willes, R. 570 1 W. Bl. 256; Amb. R. 645; 1 Ball & B. 309 1 Wils. R. 310 3 Atk. 747 Id. 222. On the other hand, the court leans against double portions for children; M'Clell. R. 356; 13 Price, R. 599 against double provisions, and double satisfactions; 3 Atk. R. 421 and against forfeitures. 3 T. R. 172. Vide, generally, 1 Burr. 419 1 Bos. & Pull. 614; 3 Bos. & Pull. 456 Ves. jr. 648 Jacob, Rep. 115; 1 Turn. & R. 350.

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Graham Boone, "Does employer bias affect worker performance?
The best way to understand the benefits of sewing on the bias is to make a garment and see how the fabric drapes, feels and reacts while sewing.
The study, The Role of Time Preferences and Exponential-Growth Bias in Retirement Savings, is copyright 2015 by Gopi Shah Goda, Matthew R.
In concluding, the authors note "while defaults and other alternatives have successfully increased average contributions in many contexts, and retirement income projections may move people towards better decisions when well-implemented, there is no evidence that these fully counteract the effects of exponential-growth bias and present bias on retirement saving decisions.
3] film thickness that exists when using the pulsed EPD method with constant bias voltage.
As a matter of politics, it may be smart strategy to complain about media bias when pressed to respond to hard questions about climate change, immigration reform, or the debt limit.
While its arguments could offer more depth in places, Media Bias in Presidential Election Coverage, as a whole, presents one of our most comprehensive works on the subject.
Unintentional bias is generally acknowledged in the counseling literature, and there are several interrelated yet distinct approaches to this construct.
The current definition of bias has expanded to include both implicit and explicit types.
Bias Random variation Systematic variation Unsystematic caused by Caused by known forces unknown forces New or unanticipated Always present Unpredictable Range is predictable
If the escape routes are NSEW, the layer-biased routing will block the routing of those escapes in the opposite bias (FIGURE 3).
There are those who have far too heavy a bias, be it in their religion or any other pursuit that they lose sight of the "jack".