bicameral

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Bicameral

The division of a legislative or judicial body into two components or chambers.

The Congress of the United States is a bicameral legislature, since it is divided into two houses, the Senate and the House of Representatives.

bicameral

adjective bifurcated, bipartite, bisected, dual chambered, multipartite, separated
See also: bipartite

bicameral

see UNICAMERAL.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bicameralism is closely bound up with federalism, of which it is one of the key features.
21 (noting that one also might choose to include as an exception to bicameralism and presentment each House's prerogative to set its own rules to "determin[e] specified internal matters," but also noting that "this 'exception' only empowers Congress to bind itself' (citing U.
I have been using bicameralism as a metaphor for thinking through the issue of human and AI consciousness merging while hinting at the politics.
In spite of these attempts, the consensus is that bicameralism is nothing more than a concept in search of a theory.
As noted earlier, rather than attack or defend bicameralism, we will argue in favour of attributing to a democratically reconstituted Senate the primary responsibility of reviewing the constitutionality of legislation.
Though at a doctrinarian level the controversy bicameralism--unicameralism with regard to the Romanian constitutional system is still very much real and continuous --arguments with concern to bicameralism (for further details see Attila, 2007: 146-54; Muraru and Muraru, 2005: 1-10; Tocqueville, 1992: 136-137; Duculescu, 2000: 19-24; Sartori, 2008: 249-256) being advanced both pro, i.
respectability of bicameralism and independence among the branches.
Bicameralism, presentment, executive discretion, pardon power, and on top of that independent judicial and jury determination of the facts, and independent judicial determination of the constitutionality of the law.
Another type of institution that has been studied is bicameralism, regarding which Roger Congleton (2006) reports that political decisions seem to be more in line with the median voter's long-run preferences in bicameral systems.
The clear text of the Constitution says that Congress can impose legal obligations on anyone, including members of the executive branch, only by going through bicameralism and presentment, and, of course, that means that the resolutions passed by Congress would just be without any legal effect because it's not a legislative action that Congress can take under our Constitution.
The third chapter is devoted to the monarchiens, who advocated bicameralism and the absolute royal veto during the early stages of the French Revolution.
This arguably undermines the bicameralism requirement set forth in Article I, Section 7.