bid

(redirected from bids fair)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.

bid

n. an offer to purchase with a specific price stated. It includes offers during an auction in which people compete by raising the bid until there is no more bidding, or contractors offer to contract to build a project or sell goods or services at a given price, with usually the lowest bidder getting the job. (See: contract)

bid

noun advance, approach, estimate, licitatio, offer, offered price, overture, presentation, price, proffer, proposal, proposition, quotation, quoted price, submission, tender
Associated concepts: auction sale, bid bond, bid in, bid off, bidder, competitive bidding, proposal, upset bid, with reserve, without reserve
See also: appeal, application, assign, call, command, detail, dictate, direct, endeavor, enforce, enjoin, impose, insist, instruct, invitation, invoke, mandate, offer, order, overture, petition, pray, prescribe, proffer, propose, proposition, request, summon, summons, writ

BID, contracts. A bid is an offer to pay a specified price for an article about to be sold at auction. The bidder has a right to withdraw his bid at any time before it is accepted, which acceptance is generally manifested by knocking down the hammer. 3 T. R. 148; Hardin's Rep. 181; Sugd. Vend. 29; Babington on Auct. 30, 42; or the bid may be withdrawn by implication. 6 Penn. St. R. 486; 8, Id. 408. Vide 0@ffer.

References in periodicals archive ?
Described as a "docudrama" miniseries, the four-night weekly series which actually claims to use materials culled from the Vatican archives (opened to scholars in 1998), bids fair to end up as yet another "slam the Catholics" exercise.
demanding allegiance--although global capitalism bids fair as the
Cambridge Companion' bids fair to become a generic term for a particular kind of collection of essays: more specific than a Festschrift or the collected papers from a conference which often reflect individuals' work-in-progress, less utilitarian than the traditional compendium of useful background information to a subject or the Kommentar by an individual scholar.
Holmes-bashing bids fair to become a closet industry in the legal academy, and Stoners book complements the wonderful screed from Albert Alschuler, Law Without Values: The Life, Work, and Legacy of Justice Holmes (2000), which portrayed Holmes as an amoral monster, responsible for much of the sorry state of our law.
Equally, the Chancellor knows he would never be forgiven by the party if he acted prematurely to bring down a Labour leader who has won two landslide victories and bids fair to secure an unprecedented third term of office.
A smile, because the driving, ``Good Time'' music of Phil Mason's New Orleans All-Stars bids fair to recreate the happy go lucky atmosphere which many of today's bands seem to lack.
Andrews in 1999 bids fair to change the accepted narrative of the years leading up to the first Wars of Religion, though limitations of space limit me to summarizing some of the more persuasive contributions.
If the show continues to draw interested users at the level of this recent show, it bids fair to be one of those few conferences that can pin "Success" on its lapel.