bind


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bind

(Obligate), verb adstringere, burden, charge, confirm, conscript, constrain, drive, encumber, exact, force, impose, indent, indenture, obligare, oblige, pledge, promise, require, sanction, set a task, warrant
Associated concepts: bind a deal, binding authority, binding instruction, binding receipt, binding transaction
Foreign phrases: Nuda ratio et nuda pactio non ligant aliquem debitorem.Naked intention and naked promise do not bind any debtor. Quodque dissolvitur eodem modo quo ligatur. A thing is unbound in the same manner that it is made binding.

bind

(Restrain), verb block, check, compel, confine, encumber, fetter, fix, hamper, hinder, immobilize, inhibit, limit, repress, secure, shut in
Associated concepts: bind over
See also: add, affix, amalgamate, annex, attach, cement, combine, confine, connect, consolidate, constrain, constrict, contain, detain, enclose, enforce, engage, estop, fetter, hamper, handcuff, hire, impose, imprison, join, limit, pledge, press, promise, restrain, restrict, trammel, vow

bind

to impose legal obligations or duties upon a person or party to an agreement.

TO BIND, BINDING, contracts. These words are applied to the contract entered into, between a master and an apprentice the latter is said to be bound.
     2. In order to make a good binding, the consent of the apprentice must be had, together with that of his father, next friend, or some one standing in loco parentis. Bac. Ab. Master and Servant, A; 8 John. 328; 2 Pen. 977; 2 Yerg. 546 1 Ashmead, 123; 10 Sergeant & Rawle, 416 1 Massachusetts, 172; 1 Vermont, 69. Whether a father has, by the common law, a right to bind out his child, during his minority without his consent, seems not to be settled. 2 Dall. 199; 7 Mass. 147; 1 Mason, 78; 1 Ashm. 267. Vide Apprentice; Father; Mother; Parent.
     3. The words to bind or binding, are also used to signify that a thing is subject to an obligation, engagement or liability; as, the judgment binds such an estate. Vide Lien.

TO BIND, OR TO BIND OVER, crim. law. The act by which a magistrate or a court hold to bail a party, accused of a crime or misdemeanor.
     2. A person accused may be bound over to appear at a court having jurisdiction of the offence charged, to answer; or he may be bound over to be of good behaviour, (q. v.) or to keep the peace. See Surety of the Peace.
     3. On refusing to enter into the requisite recognizance, the accused may be committed to prison.

References in periodicals archive ?
Tysabri (or natalizumab) binds to an ICAM and blocks its function, thereby stopping activated immune cells from leaving the bloodstream.
When the scientists expose the system to certain vapors, some chemicals bind to the dyes or diffuse into the polymer.
If you continue to crank counterclockwise and bind the cable, you'll lose tension on the winch.
In this manner, BIND will become the world's most comprehensive repository of data and research about molecular interactions and reactions in humans and other organisms studied by scientists in some 16 different fields.
The results indicated that there are valid reasons why the natural substrate, kappa-casein, binds and is cleaved between positions 105-106.
We expect additional patent issuances over the coming months continuing to further bolster this broad and growing patent estate," said Scott Minick, CEO of BIND.
However, he points out that Kane and other researchers have also developed anti-anthrax-toxin agents that use polymers as a scaffolding for peptides that bind PA.
Jesus says to the twelve), "Truly, I tell you, whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven" (Matt 18:18).
BIND Biosciences, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing a new class of highly selective targeted therapeutics called Accurins[TM], announced today the presentation of late-breaker clinical data for BIND-014, the lead drug candidate within a new class of targeted therapeutics that are programmed to concentrate at tumors, at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2012 Annual Meeting.
When certain cell-surface receptors bind a chemical stimulus, such as an opiate or a hormone, they interact with so-called G proteins.