blazon


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The Academy of Armory, or A Storehouse of Armory and Blazon.
Part 3, "Dramatizing Dismemberment," includes: Patricia Marchesi, "'Limbs mangled and torn asunder': Dismemberment, Theatricality, and the Blazon in Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus" (85-96); Ariane M.
a developer of online marketing solutions, announced today that a total of 16 new features were added to its Blazon app.
The combover rampant with gules cross niblicks and ingots or on a blazon argent (Rampant combover with red, crossed golf clubs and gold ingots on a silver shield)
Talking to myself like this, in a blazon and an emblem,
As tourists continue to search for new and exciting destinations Japan is moving up the wish list," confirmed Sarah Campbell, director of Blazon Communications, the Middle East & North Africa representative of Blossom Japan, a high-end travel trade event taking place in Kyoto, Japan, February 13-16, 2012.
Blazon Communications, a bespoke agency has been appointed as exclusive sales agent for Blossom Japan, a high-end international travel exhibition.
Other readers have treated the multitude of precious stones as symbolic signifiers, objective correlatives to the descriptive blazon, or as bawdy referents to conquered maidenheads or the sexual organs of either sex.
Her task, at the Eugene Public Library on Sunday, was to choose the correct blazon - the formal description of a coat of arms, flag or similar emblem - to create a proper shield.
13-year-old Matthew Blazon of New Hampshire, who along with his parents, have spent nearly every vacation since he was 6 years old visiting state capitol buildings.
We thought it would be not so much a gimmick but an opportunity for us to feature wines from the Southern Hemisphere," says John Blazon, master sommelier and manager of wine sales and standards for Disney.
The poem is not so much about the thistle as blazon of national emblem but about our habits of looking and the linguistic habitus in which our "looking-at" achieves social meaning and authority.