movement

(redirected from bodily movement)
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Related to bodily movement: translatory movement

movement

(Activity), noun campaign, cause, mass movement, motion, operation, principle, series of actions directed towards a particular end, undertaking

movement

(Progress), noun action, agitation, circulation, course, denomination, effort, great cause, interest, issue, measure, outflow, performance, removal, shift, step, stir, stride, transition, transmittal, traveling

movement

(Shipment), noun cartage, conveyance, transit, transportation
See also: activity, band, campaign, circulation, course, denomination, dispatch, operation, outflow, progress, transition, transmittal
References in periodicals archive ?
bodily movement from the contraction of skeletal muscles resulting in increased energy expenditure) [5].
For every volition is accompanied by an expectation or belief, that the bodily movement wished will immediately follow the wish.
By subduing the distress signals, the mind is more able to handle the activity which can then translate into more aggressive bodily movement.
It is not the case that every bodily movement is identical with some action.
It is a place where speech, timbre, and pitch connect with percussion, rhythm, and bodily movement, a place where North American language was modified without being fundamentally changed.
10), does consider the subject of embodiment across confessional lines, but notes the Evangelical disdain for dance and bodily movement in contrast to the Catholic use of ritual dance in Bolivian popular piety.
The 21-year-old attached motion sensors to a number of golfers and used the latest motion capture technology to monitor the bodily movement of a range of golfers as they putted.
Subjects' sleep performance was assessed by interviews upon awakening, self-reported questionnaires and a wrist actigraph, which records bodily movement during sleep.
Criminal culpability does not depend solely on the presence of an intentional bodily movement that risks or causes harm (the act requirement) and on a general rational capacity (which is always presumed, but can be challenged with affirmative defenses such as legal insanity), although these essentially mental phenomena are necessary components of responsibility.
It can also mean a sort of personal power, namely to act, or bring about a bodily movement.
1) Though there is considerable disagreement over what should count as an "overt act," one strategy taken by many theorists is to define an act as a "willed bodily movement.
For instance, on Davidson's view, we can distinguish between 1 and 2 by way of distinguishing between descriptions: one and the same event can have a physical description as a bodily movement and a mental description as an action.