Bookkeeping

(redirected from bookkeeper)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Bookkeeping

The process of systematically and methodically recording the financial accounts and transactions of an entity.

Double-entry bookkeeping is an accounting system that requires that for every financial transaction there must be a debit and a credit. When merchandise is sold for cost, there is a debit to cash and a credit to sales.

See: accounting, computation, registration
References in periodicals archive ?
It may also be possible to become a bookkeeper through an apprenticeship scheme.
I am proud to be able to call myself a Registered Bookkeeper.
Team Valley-based Access Training is offering a Level 2 Certificate in Bookkeeping after the National Apprenticeship Service reported local firms were finding it difficult to recruit and train suitable bookkeepers.
Sadly, our bookkeeper is no longer with us to confirm this story.
An Australia-wide research study into fraud committed by bookkeepers has revealed new evidence of the size of the problem and its devastating impact.
ACCORDING TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PROFESSIONAL BOOKKEEPERS (AIFB), today's professional bookkeeper is "part accountant, part tax whiz and part financial analyst.
A BOOKKEEPER claimed she stole nearly pounds 900,000 from a company which trusted her to keep her alcoholic husband alive.
If there's a problem, the bank calls up the bookkeeper who caused the problem, who then said that everything was fine.
Mainstream's founders, John Burgess and Mark McClelland, who started the company on a few hundred incorporation dollars and a copy of QuickBooks, needed a trained bookkeeper to look after their increasingly complex finances.
Sir, I will have to disappoint those of your readers who are eager to know how we managed to run a very profitable, international business such as Green E~ Black's with only a part-time bookkeeper until we sold to Cadbury three years ago.
Greg's categorization of documents into "foul papers" and "prompt books," the former category representing rough authorial drafts that are assumed to contain "contradictions and uncertainties of action and unresolved textual tangles," and the latter, theatrical manuscripts subject to the "ordered levelling" of a bookkeeper, expected to show a degree of textual regularization and tidying as well as specification of performance details.