brand

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brand

noun badge, colophon, copyright label, earmark, emblem, hallmark, identification mark, identiiication tag, impress, imprint, insignia, label, mark, nota, owner's mark, owner's sign, piste, seal, sigil, sign, signet, smirch, stain, stamp, sticker, stigma, stigmatism, tag, taint, ticket, token, trade name, trademark, watermark
Associated concepts: brand name

brand

(Mark), verb autograph, blaze, distinguish by mark, earmark, emblaze, emboss, endorse, engrave, identify, impress, imprint, inscribe, label, notam homini inurere, notare, print, put a mark on, put an indication on, seal, sign, stamp, tag

brand

(Stigmatize), verb asperse, attaint, besmear, bespatter, blacken, blot, bring into discredit, cast a slur upon, cast aspersions at, corrupt, debase, decry, defame, defile, deride, derogate, dirty, discredit, disgrace, dishonor, disparage, excite disapprobation, hold up to shame, impugn, involve in shame, malign, pillory, put to shame, reflect upon, slur, smear, smirch, smudge, soil, stain, sully, taint, tar, throw dishonor upon, vilify, vilipend
Associated concepts: libel, reputation, slander
See also: arraign, attaint, burn, class, classify, condemn, defame, denigrate, denounce, derogate, disapprove, discredit, disgrace, dishonor, disparagement, disrepute, earmark, humiliate, ignominy, implicate, indicant, indication, infamy, involve, kind, label, manner, onus, opprobrium, pillory, reproach, scandal, shame, smear, specialty, stamp, stigma, sully, tarnish, trademark

TO BRAND. An ancient mode of punishment, which was to inflict a mark on an offender with a hot iron. This barbarous punishment has been generally disused.

References in periodicals archive ?
It may be a different size, color and shape from the brand-name version.
Although generic drugs are experiencing increased popularity, there's not a generic counterpart to every brand-name drug.
The Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984 encourages the production of generic medicines while protecting the rights of brand-name manufacturers.
In an effort to control those costs, Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Illinois is looking at the prospect of paying pharmacists to check with physicians to see whether it would be appropriate to change prescriptions for brand-name drugs to generic drugs, said Robert Kieckhefer, a spokesman for the Illinois Blues.
Therefore, it comes as a surprise that most companies conducted very little brand-name testing.
Are generic drugs really the same as brand-name drugs, or are they inferior imitations?