breath


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
See: suggestion

BREATH, med. juris. The air expelled from the chest at each expiration.
     2. Breathing, though a usual sign of life, is not conclusive that a child was wholly born alive, as breathing may take place before the whole delivery of the mother is complete. 5 Carr. & Payn, 329; S. C. 24 E. C. L. R. 344. Vide Birth; Life; Infanticide.

References in classic literature ?
It quite took their breath away, and they stared first at the table and then at their mother, who looked as if she enjoyed it immensely.
This old house, for example, which sometimes has positively oppressed my breath with its smell of decaying timber
In those cases I always stopped and held my breath till I was sure Harris had not awakened--then I crept along again.
I tried two of the keys, just as soft as I could; but they seemed to make such a power of racket that I couldn't hardly get my breath I was so scared.
Omer, taking up his glass, 'because it's considered softening to the passages, by which this troublesome breath of mine gets into action.
And, ere I knew, I was bending over her, and as her sweet breath came and went I whispered: "Grace o' God, I am here.
Then they sent a message down to the Doctor to say that they would have to take a rest soon; and that they would pull the boat over to an island not far off, and hide it in a deep bay till they had got breath enough to go on.
Big words never killed so much as a mouse--least of all yon deer which has got away while you were filling all the woods with your noisy breath.
Or--a more convenient, economical, and consequently more probable alternative-- would he be satisfied to rise and take breath at the surface of the water, like a whale, and so renew for twenty-four hours the atmospheric provision?
Swathed about his forehead, and hanging down over his face, so low as to be shaken by his breath, Mr.
The great Admiral and good seaman could read aright the signs of sea and sky, as his order to prepare to anchor at the end of the day sufficiently proves; but, all the same, the mere idea of these baffling easterly airs, coming on at any time within half an hour or so, after the firing of the first shot, is enough to take one's breath away, with the image of the rearmost ships of both divisions falling off, unmanageable, broadside on to the westerly swell, and of two British Admirals in desperate jeopardy.
Occasionally a breath of Nature, a raindrop of pathos and tenderness, or a gleam of humor, will find its way into the midst of his fantastic imagery, and make us feel as if, after all, we were yet within the limits of our native earth.