breathe


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References in classic literature ?
I had to fly low to get sufficient air to breathe, but I took a straight course across an old sea bottom and so had to rise only a few feet above the ground.
for you seem to breathe as if you were oppressed by some secret cause of uneasiness, and your eyes are filled with tears.
Do you know what this wretched fellow will do, if I give him time to breathe again?
If so, how delightful for them, and we shall all breathe a sigh of relief, but there will be no story.
he cried angrily; "or breathe in a whisper; or put a clothes-pin on your nose.
His seconds worked over him furiously, chafing his legs, slapping his abdomen, stretching the hip-cloth out with their fingers so that he might breathe more easily.
I see that all is for the best," said Michel, "and that this atmosphere is a useful invention; for it not only allows us to breathe, but it prevents us from roasting.
We may cease marvelling at the embryo of an air-breathing mammal or bird having branchial slits and arteries running in loops, like those in a fish which has to breathe the air dissolved in water, by the aid of well-developed branchiae.
Unconsciously Pollyanna lifted her head higher--it seemed so hard to breathe.
Breathing is intermediate between the two: we normally breathe without the help of the will, but we can alter or stop our breathing if we choose.
Although he sometimes dreamed sentimentally of marriage in the abstract, of actual marriage, of marriage with a flesh-and-blood individual, of marriage that involved clergymen and 'Voices that Breathe o'er Eden,' and giggling bridesmaids and cake, Dudley Pickering was afraid with a terror that woke him sweating in the night.
Now it is well known that when there are many of these flowers together their odor is so powerful that anyone who breathes it falls asleep, and if the sleeper is not carried away from the scent of the flowers, he sleeps on and on forever.