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References in classic literature ?
His curling lips took a new twist upward; he tucked his umbrella briskly under his arm; and produced from the breast of his coat a large old-fashioned black pocketbook.
It came on briskly, and came up to the front of the chateau.
Scrooge's former self, now grown a young man, came briskly in, accompanied by his fellow-prentice.
Dick, considering, and looking vacantly at me, 'I should -' The contemplation of me seemed to inspire him with a sudden idea, and he added, briskly, 'I should wash him
Joe and Joe were briskly clearing the table for the pie and pudding.
They tell me, Mopo, that the fire from above ran briskly through they huts.
and briskly turned his back to the ladies in order to stand at the edge of the veranda and shake the water out of his hat.
Livesey's; he went on as before speaking clear and kind and drawing briskly at his pipe between every word or two.
Don Quixote drew himself up briskly in his saddle, fixed himself in his stirrups, settled his visor, gave Rocinante the spur, and with an easy bearing advanced to kiss the hands of the duchess, who, having sent to summon the duke her husband, told him while Don Quixote was approaching all about the message; and as both of them had read the First Part of this history, and from it were aware of Don Quixote's crazy turn, they awaited him with the greatest delight and anxiety to make his acquaintance, meaning to fall in with his humour and agree with everything he said, and, so long as he stayed with them, to treat him as a knight-errant, with all the ceremonies usual in the books of chivalry they had read, for they themselves were very fond of them.
They slid down behind it with remarkable celerity, and from this position they began briskly to slice up the blue men.
The liquor went briskly round; all absent friends were toasted, and the party moved forward to the rendezvous in high spirits.
Sometimes after having been roasted in the fire, the natives snatch it briskly from the embers, and permitting it to slip out of the yielding rind into a vessel of cold water, stir up the mixture, which they call 'bo-a-sho'.