calendar

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Calendar

A list of cases that are awaiting trial or other settlement, often called a trial list or docket.

A special calendar is an all-inclusive listing of cases awaiting trial; it contains dates for trial, names of counsel, and the estimated time required for trial. It is maintained by a trial judge in some states and by a court clerk in others.

Calendar call is a court session during which the cases that await trial are called in order to determine the current status of each case and to assign a trial date.

calendar

1) n. the list of cases to be called for trial before a particular court; 2) v. to set and give a date and time for a case, petition or motion to be heard by a court. Usually a judge, a trial setting commissioner, or the clerk of the court calendars cases.

calendar

(List of cases), noun agenda, cases ready for argument, court's log, docket, enumeration of causes arranged for trial, list of cases set down for hearing, list of causes arranged for trial, list of causes instituted in court, list of causes ready for trial, motion docket, order of cases, record, register, register of cases, schedule, systematic arrangement of cases, table of cases, timetable, trial list
Associated concepts: calendar practice, court calendar, fasti

calendar

(Record of yearly periods), noun agenda, almanac, annals, chronicle, chronology, daybook, diary, docket, established division of time, history, journal, list of appointments, list of events, log, logbook, memoranda, menology, order of business, plans, program, record, record of yearly periods, register, schedule, schedule of events, sequence of events, system of reckoning time, table, tabular register of the year, timetable
Associated concepts: calendar day, calendar month, calennar week, calendar year, Gregorian calendar
See also: agenda, date, docket, empanel, file, note, program, record, register, schedule

calendar

a listing of cases that are ready to be heard.
References in periodicals archive ?
These seven men are gathered in consultation, in participation or as witnesses to the primary scene, where a royal governor celebrates a calendrical ritual that occurred during the first month of the year and which was probably related to the new year.
The contest spans both the object and the calendrical signature of the object's creation.
In a calendrical context, Ovid continues to prefer the name Caesar bequeathed to his heir in 44, rather than the monstrous name granted to him by the senate in 27 BC.
Both table 1 and figure 1 show that NIESR's monthly GDP estimates, here considered for calendrical quarters only, track both first and latest GDP releases more closely than nowcasts from the other (statistical) models.
When the master again asks if Andrew can state "with certainty" (316) the "cause" of a more recent event in Scots farming--one which occasioned "great loss" following a "burn" being "dammed up with dead carcasses" (316)--he reverts to the alternative calendrical time of lowland shepherds, where "fixing the date" is equivalent to telling a tale.
In this case, it may be said that the device that "Wednesday" invokes is the calendrical organization of the course of which this class is a part.
Before FusSMAN's publication of the Trasaka reliquary, the only calendrical evidence on the point was the appearance of the Babylonian months Ululu, in the Laghman II inscription of Asoka (DAVARY & HUMBACH 1974: 11), and Nisannu, in the Surkh Kotal inscription SK4 of Kaniska year 31 (GERSHEVITCH 1979: 64), to which we may now add FALK's reading above of year 156 Aiaru 23 in the first inscription of the Trasaka reliquary.
Females either are excluded from these calendrical ceremonies or are limited to an ancillary role.
Moreover, thinking this relation allows a counterpoint to emerge that underscores the debasement of a calendrical conception of time by modernity, how '[t]he triumph of chronology--of the line--leads us to desire a simple circle' (214).
In order to develop a historical perspective, Coffin identifies a perception of calendrical time and its relation to historical narrative as a seminal point of understanding, and argues that the linguistic choices made to represent such concepts as the sequencing and segmenting of time are key to historical understanding.
The Maya used three calendrical systems operating concurrently: the 260 day Ceremonial Calendar, the Vague Year of 365 days which meshed with the Ceremonial Calendar through a Calendar Round of 52 year cycles, and the Long Count calendar which established the beginning of the present creation at exactly 13.
And in turn, we cannot understand the innovations of these almanac calendars without situating them against broader calendrical changes.