cap

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cap

n. slang for maximum, as the most interest that can be charged on an "adjustable rate" promissory note.

cap

noun ceiling, greatest amount, lid, limit, maxiium amount

cap

verb complete, conclude, end, finish, finish off, get done, get through with, perfect, terminate
See also: culminate, culmination, finish, pinnacle, surpass

CAP

abbreviation for COMMON AGRICULTURAL POLICY.
References in classic literature ?
It's been unoccupied time out of mind, and stands in a lonely part of the coast, but those who fish in the neighborhood have often heard strange noises there, and lights have been seen about the wood at night, and an old fellow in a red cap has been seen at the windows more than once, which people take to be the ghost of the body buried there.
He wore what appeared to be a woolen cap, and, still more alarming, of a most sanguinary red.
They found the doctor seated in his little study, clad in his dark camlet[1] robe of knowledge, with his black velvet cap, after the manner of Boerhaave,[2] Van Helmont,[3] and other medical sages, a pair of green spectacles set in black horn upon his clubbed nose, and poring over a German folio that reflected back the darkness of his physiognomy.
There lay her grandmother with her cap pulled far over her face, and looking very strange.
Dorothy looked inside the Golden Cap and saw some words written upon the lining.
This Cap had been made for a wedding present to Quelala, and it is said to have cost the princess half her kingdom.
Quelala being the first owner of the Golden Cap," replied the Monkey, "he was the first to lay his wishes upon us.
Dodo need not make such a slavery of her mourning; she need not wear that cap any more among her friends.
Nobody chose the subject; it all came out of Dodo's cap.
Cadwallader was gone, Celia said privately to Dorothea, "Really, Dodo, taking your cap off made you like yourself again in more ways than one.
He turned himself sideways to the carriage, and leaned back, with his face thrown up to the sky, and his head hanging down; then recovered himself, fumbled with his cap, and made a bow.
The accursed was already under the carriage with some half-dozen particular friends, pointing out the chain with his blue cap.