caution

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caution

(Vigilance), noun attention, attentiveness, care, carefulness, cautio, circumspection, concern, consideration, cura, diligence, exactitude, forethought, guardedness, heed, heedfulness, meticulousness, mindfulness, prudence, prudentia, regard, thoroughness, wariness, watchfulness
Associated concepts: due caution, ordinary caution

caution

(Warning), noun admonition, alarm, alert, augury, caveat, exhortation, foreboding, foretelling, monition, notice, omen, portent, precursor, presage, prognosis, prognostic
Associated concepts: cautionary instructions

caution

verb admonish, advise against, apprise, be vigilant, communicate to, counsel, dissuade, exhort, exhort to take heed, forearm, foreshow, forewarn, give advice, give fair warning, give intimation of impending evil, give notice, give warning, give warning of possible harm, inform, make aware, monere, notify of danger, persuade against, predict, prenotify, prepare for the worst, prescribe, prewarn, put on guard, remonstrate, serve notice, sound the alarm, spell danger, take precautions, urge, warn
Associated concepts: due caution, ordinary caution, unusual caution
Foreign phrases: Abundans cautela non nocet.Extreme caution does no harm.
See also: admonish, admonition, advise, alert, care, castigate, caveat, charge, counsel, deliberation, deter, deterrent, diligence, discourage, discretion, dissuade, exhort, expostulate, forewarn, heed, hesitation, indicant, inform, monition, notice, notification, notify, portend, precaution, premonition, prudence, restraint, signify, warn, warning

caution

1 a formal warning given to a person suspected or accused of an offence that his words will be taken down and may be used in evidence.
2 a warning to a person by the police, or in Scotland by the Procurator Fiscal, that while it is considered that there is enough evidence for a prosecution, no such prosecution will take place but that the matter will be kept on file.
3 a notice entered on the register of title to land that prevents a proprietor from disposing of land without a notice to the person who entered the caution.
4 see GUARANTEE.

CAUTION. A term of the Roman civil law, which is used in various senses. It signifies, sometimes, security, or security promised. Generally every writing is called cautio, a caution by which any object is provided for. Vicat, ad verb. In the common law a distinction is made between a contract and the security. The contract may be good and the security void. The contract may be divisible, and the security entire and indivisible. 2 Burr, 1082. The securities or cautions judicially required of the defendant, are, judicio sisti, to attend and appear during the pendency of the suit; de rato, to confirm the acts of his attorney or proctor; judicium solvi, to pay the sum adjudged against him. Coop. Just. 647; Hall's Admiralty Practice, 12; 2 Brown, Civ. Law, 356.

CAUTION, TURATORY, Scotch law. Juratory caution is that which a suspender swears is the best he can offer in order to obtain a suspension. Where the suspender cannot, from his low or suspected circumstances, procure unquestionable security, juratory caution is admitted. Ersk. Pr. L. Scot. 4, 3, 6.

References in classic literature ?
Allen made her way through the throng of men by the door, as swiftly as the necessary caution would allow; Catherine, however, kept close at her side, and linked her arm too firmly within her friend's to be torn asunder by any common effort of a struggling assembly.
But the man who went softly, by circuitous ways, peering with caution, seeking after secrecy--that was the man who received no suspension of judgment from White Fang, and who went away abruptly, hurriedly, and without dignity.
Time, however, and the satisfaction I had that I was in no danger of being discovered by these people, began to wear off my uneasiness about them; and I began to live just in the same composed manner as before, only with this difference, that I used more caution, and kept my eyes more about me than I did before, lest I should happen to be seen by any of them; and particularly, I was more cautious of firing my gun, lest any of them, being on the island, should happen to hear it.
She also stumbled, with a large balance of success against her failures, through various philanthropic recommendations to Try our Mixture, Try our Family Black, Try our Orange-flavoured Pekoe, challenging competition at the head of Flowery Teas; and various cautions to the public against spurious establishments and adulterated articles.
They went out presently to go up to the top of the hill, where I used to go; but they being strong, and a good company, nor alone, as I was, used none of my cautions to go up by the ladder, and pulling it up after them, to go up a second stage to the top, but were going round through the grove unwarily, when they were surprised with seeing a light as of fire, a very little way from them, and hearing the voices of men, not of one or two, but of a great number.
You understand there was no time to carry him down with infinite pre- cautions and wait to see how he got on.
In such circumstances, common prudence dictated that Heyward and his companions should imitate a caution that proceeded from so intelligent a source.
Joe Green went on very well; he learned quickly, and was so attentive and careful that John began to trust him in many things; but as I have said, he was small of his age, and it was seldom that he was allowed to exercise either Ginger or me; but it so happened one morning that John was out with Justice in the luggage cart, and the master wanted a note to be taken immediately to a gentleman's house, about three miles distant, and sent his orders for Joe to saddle me and take it, adding the caution that he was to ride steadily.
After closing the envelope again, I accompanied the delivery of the letter to Miss Vanstone, the younger, by a word of caution.
I communicated to Magwitch - in New South Wales - when he first wrote to me - from New South Wales - the caution that he must not expect me ever to deviate from the strict line of fact.
We did not give them a full draught at first, but poured in the water by drops, to moisten their mouths and throats, which were extremely swelled: by this caution they were soon well.
The answer is, that it could only have been done for greater caution, and to guard against all cavilling refinements in those who might hereafter feel a disposition to curtail and evade the legitimatb authorities of the Union.