character witness


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character witness

n. a person who testifies in a trial on behalf of a person (usually a criminal defendant) as to that person's good ethical qualities and morality both by the personal knowledge of the witness and the person's reputation in the community. Such testimony is primarily relevant when the party's honesty or morality is an issue, particularly in most criminal cases and civil cases such as fraud.

References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Mirror, the Oscar-winning screenwriter Black, who recently moved to London to spend more time with Olympic diver Tom, will be named as a character witness in a lawsuit by aspiring actor Michael Egan against the 48-year-old director.
Brooks, 45, and Kuttner, 74, smiled at Ms Payne as she entered the witness box at the Old Bailey in London as a character witness.
Gary Neville, who has been present at Bolton Crown Court throughout the trial, which started on Monday, was called as a character witness for the defence.
Gary Neville, who has been at Bolton Crown Court throughout the trial, which started on Monday, was called as a character witness for the defence.
And Sinclair said: "I was not surprised to be named as a character witness.
Ex-Sunderland star Ferdinand, who snubbed both Terry and Ashley Cole - who was a character witness for his England team-mate at the trial - at the pre-match handshake, has expressed his gratitude for the backing he received from QPR fans.
Sandusky allegedly asked if he would be a character witness.
David, 53, was at the heart of Orbona after his abuser's wife called him 30 years after he had escaped Quarriers, asking him to be a character witness for her husband.
Once on the witness stand, Steve surprises himself and everyone else with the heartfelt character witness and alibi.
If he is ditched it would be a massive blow for the player with Kay expected to be a key character witness at Barton's court case to face serious assault charges.
Reilly is a popular figure in racing, both among jockeys and fellow officials, one of whom, stewards' secretary and close friend Paul Barton, appeared as a character witness in court when he was given a driving ban.
More frequently, I have been called on to act as a character witness, either for someone on trial in court or for someone who is seeking a new job.