charity


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Related to charity: UNICEF, Charity begins at home

charity

n. 1) in general the sentiment of benevolence, doing good works, assisting the less fortunate, philanthropy, and contributing to the general public. 2) an organization which exists to help those in need or provide educational, scientific, religious and artistic assistance to members of the public. Charities are usually corporations established under state guidelines and require IRS approval in order for contributions to them to be deductible from gross income by donors.

charity

noun active giving, aid, almsgiving, altruism, assistance, backing, benefaction, beneficentia, benevolentness, bestowal, bounteousness, clemency, considerateness, consideration, donation, dotation, endowment, generosity, generous giving, gift, good will, grace, grant, help, humaneness, humanitarianism, humanity, kindness, liberalness, magnanimity, munificence, philanthropic gift, philanthropy, relief, support, willing help
Associated concepts: charitable and benevolent institution, charitable association, charitable bequest, charitable contriiutions, charitable corporation, charitable enterprise, chariiable gift, charitable institution, charitable organization, charitable purposes, charitable trusts, charitable use
See also: aid, benefit, benevolence, clemency, condonation, contribution, donation, favor, foundation, gift, goodwill, gratuity, help, largess, lenience, organization, philanthropy, present

charity

the giving of money to help the needy or a body that is established to administer such donations. The concept of charity dates from a permission given by the Emperor Constantine allowing subjects to make bequests to the church. This facility came to be so abused that it was severely restricted by the Emperor Valentinian; this restraint was, however, gradually relaxed so that by the time of Justinian it had become a fixed maxim of the civil law that bequests to pious uses were entitled to privileged treatment. In English law, the State of Charitable Uses Act of 1601 codified the received law up to that point, and the preamble to that statute still provides the starting point for the definition of charity in modern law. This, according to the House of Lords, comprises gifts for the relief of poverty, for the advancement of religion, for the advancement of education, and for other purposes beneficial to the community not falling under any of the preceding heads but within the words or spirit of the Act of 1601. A charitable trust is treated more favourably than others, in that it is not subject to the rule against PERPETUITIES, it is not subject to the beneficiary principle that requires that trusts be for the benefit of persons rather than of purposes, and it attracts favourable tax treatment. To qualify as charitable, however, a gift must be exclusively charitable, that is, it must be so conditioned that no part of it can be devoted to any non-charitable purpose. If a charitable gift fails because the object no longer exists or the purpose has been satisfied, the gift maybe applied CY PRES to the satisfaction of similar charitable purposes. Charities are under the general jurisdiction of the Charity Commissioners in England and Wales and the Lord Advocate in Scotland. In Scotland, for tax purposes, charity and charitable purposes are to be interpreted according to English law.

CHARITY. In its widest sense it denotes all the good affections which men ought to bear towards each other; 1 Epistle to Cor. c. xiii.; in its most restricted and usual sense, it signifies relief to the poor. This species of charity is a mere moral duty, which cannot be enforced by the law. Kames on Eq. 17. But it is not employed in either of these senses in law; its signification is derived chiefly from the statute of 43 Eliz. c. 4. Those purposes are considered charitable which are enumerated in that act, or which by analogy are deemed within its spirit and intendment. 9 Ves. 405; 10 Ves, 541; 2 Vern. 387; Shelf. Mortm. 59. Lord Chancellor Camden describes a charity to be a gift to a general public use, which extends to the rich as well as to the poor. Ambl. 651; Boyle on Charities, 51; 2 Ves. sen. 52; Ambl. 713; 2 Ves. jr. 272; 6 Ves. 404; 3 Rawle, 170; 1 Penna. R. 49 2 Dana, 170; 2 Pet. 584; 3 Pet. 99, 498 9 Cow. 481; 1 Hawks, 96; 12 Mass. 537; 17 S. & R. 88; 7 Verm. 241; 5 Harr. & John. 392; 6 Harr. & John. 1; 9 Pet. 566; 6 Pet. 435; 9 Cranch, 331; 4 Wheat. 1; 9 Wend. 394; 2 N. H. Rep. 21, 510; 9 Cow. 437; 7 John. Cb. R. 292; 3 Leigh. 450; 1 Dev. Eq. Rep. 276; 4 Bouv. Inst. n. 3976, et seq.

References in classic literature ?
The twins had accepted several invitations while the reception was in progress, and had also volunteered to play some duets at an amateur entertainment for the benefit of a local charity.
Let us draw the curtain of charity over the rest of the scene.
It's only natural she should long for a change; besides she'd look like a charity child always wearing the same brown with a white apron.
John Knightley had really a great regard for his fatherinlaw, and generally a strong sense of what was due to him; but it was too often for Emma's charity, especially as there was all the pain of apprehension frequently to be endured, though the offence came not.
One or two meetings of this kind had taken place, without affording Elinor any chance of engaging Lucy in private, when Sir John called at the cottage one morning, to beg, in the name of charity, that they would all dine with Lady Middleton that day, as he was obliged to attend the club at Exeter, and she would otherwise be quite alone, except her mother and the two Miss Steeles.
Loscombe's correspondent -- the nephew of the gentleman who owns this house, and whose charity has given me an asylum, during the heavy affliction of my sickness, under his own roof.
His earnings in his native town, where he worked for a wholesale dealer, had been after a lower rate; he had been paid weekly, and of his weekly earnings a large proportion had gone to objects of piety and charity.
He was generous; and charity, as it is well known, covereth a multitude of sins, in another sense than that in which it is said to do so in Scripture.
With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan--to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves, and with all nations.
To which Merlin made answer, "The devil, Sancho, is a blockhead and a great scoundrel; I sent him to look for your master, but not with a message from Montesinos but from myself; for Montesinos is in his cave expecting, or more properly speaking, waiting for his disenchantment; for there's the tail to be skinned yet for him; if he owes you anything, or you have any business to transact with him, I'll bring him to you and put him where you choose; but for the present make up your mind to consent to this penance, and believe me it will be very good for you, for soul as well for body- for your soul because of the charity with which you perform it, for your body because I know that you are of a sanguine habit and it will do you no harm to draw a little blood.
Excuse me, excuse me, but I owe this money to the charity fund, -- a deposit which I promised to pay this morning.
Well, among other things she told me that, whereas you are not a kinsman of mine, that she is my nearest relative; that you have no right whatever to enter into family relations with us; and that it is wrong and shameful for me to be living upon your earnings and charity.