cheque


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See: coupon

cheque

a BILL OF EXCHANGE drawn on a banker, payable on demand. A cheque operates as a mandate or authority to the drawee's bank to pay the party named as drawer and debit the account of its customer, the drawer. Cheques are essentially negotiable instruments and may be negotiated by indorsement. The Bills of Exchange Act 1882, however, provides that a cheque may be crossed. In this case the cheque should be presented for payment by a bank (rather than the person named as drawee). If accompanied by the words ‘not negotiable’, this has the effect that the cheque cannot be negotiated, and the words ‘account payee’ or ‘account payee only’ mean that the cheque cannot be passed on to another.
References in classic literature ?
Utterson asking rather suddenly: "And you don't know if the drawer of the cheque lives there?
You will give me the cheque I ask," he replied with a snarl, "or neither you nor your child nor your husband will ever again set foot within any port, civilized or otherwise.
The end of it was that Jane Clayton wrote out a cheque of large denomination and handed it to Nikolas Rokoff, who left her cabin with a grin of satisfaction upon his lips.
I had occasion on Tuesday to pay away two cheques, one for L80, and the other for L120, and here they are returned with a bank notice that we have already overdrawn to the extent of some hundreds.
And if a cheque of decent amount came out of the envelope, such incident in itself was a whole drunk.
Come to me when your marriage day is set and I will give you a cheque for the money.
I can promise you a cheque beneath your plate which even you might think worth considering, wine in your glass which kings might sigh for, cigars by your side which even your Mr.
Her behaviour was so affecting that he was going to write her a cheque for twenty pounds more; but he restrained his feelings: the carriage was in waiting to take him to dinner, so he tripped away with a "God bless you, my dear, always come here when you come to town, you know.
A cheque, which dropped out when I opened it, informed me (before I had mastered the contents) that Sergeant Cuff's dismissal from the inquiry after the Moonstone was now a settled thing.
Then suppose you try, ma'am,' said Bounderby, laying an envelope with a cheque in it in her little basket.
Now, next you'll want a cheque--or you'll say you want it, though you've capital enough somewhere, if one only knew where, but you'd be peppered and salted and grilled on a gridiron before you'd own to it--and that cheque I'll write.
Come, come, I'll write you a cheque,' said the little man; and down he sat at the table for that purpose.