chicanery


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Both created a system of book-keeping chicanery, that ensured the bankers' losses would in future be picked up by the people.
So, therefore, there seems to be an element of chicanery in the manner in which the files were identified and ostensibly destroyed," Tewari added.
To compound his self-confessed chicanery, last week Dennis challenged police to 'come and nick me if they think I have done something wrong.
As ratings steadily declined, the whole meaningless charade felt like shameless chicanery.
Author Leonard Richards, a professor of history with roots in the Golden State, enjoyed himself in putting together this story of crude politics and often cruder men, clever maneuvering and outright chicanery, all spiced with a heady mixture of gold miners, entrepreneurs, outlaws and vigilantes.
Though the central mystery does hold one's interest, tin-eared dialogue, unlikely staging and dramatic conveniences all work against our being swept up in the chicanery.
The shock doctrine is "the use of public disorientation following massive collective shocks--wars, terrorist attacks, natural disasters--to push through unpopular economic measures" and Klein's book details US government policy action following September 11, Hurricane Katrina and the Iraq war, among others, to illustrate this style of political chicanery.
Until we have term limits or some other limit on government whimsy, we must live with the egos and chicanery of our elected officials--"our government.
No one - certainly no member of Congress - knows what mischief lurks in the mammoth, 1,400-page document, but much of the waste, abuse, special-interest giveaways and other chicanery is sure to be found in the 9,800 special earmarks.
When you contemplate all the chicanery revealed by the sub-prime and other Wall Street scandals, aren't you a bit concerned about the soundness of our economy?
When one considers the chicanery rife in virtually all insurance systems, on the one hand, and the predictably unlimited appetite for "free" medical services, on the other, one sees the nature of the impasse.
Yerkes built his public-transportation empire with chicanery that top executives at Enron would have applauded but would not have dared emulate.