chief

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chief

noun boss, captain, caput, chairman, chief controller, chieftain, commandant, commander, directing head, director, dux, employer, foreman, general, head, headman, headperson, highest ranking person, leader, manager, organizer, overlooker, overseer, person in authority, person in charge, president, princeps, principal, principal person, senior, superior, supervising director
Associated concepts: chief agent, chief counsel, chief deputy, chief examiner, chief executive, chief executive officer, chief fiscal officer, chief judge, chief justice, chief of fire department, chief of police, chief officer of a corporation or business, chief place of business
See also: absolute, basic, best, cardinal, central, critical, crucial, director, dominant, employer, essential, grave, important, leading, major, master, necessary, outstanding, paramount, prevailing, prevalent, primary, prime, principal, prominent, salient, sovereign, stellar, superintendent, superior, superlative, vital

CHIEF, principal. One who is put above the rest; as, chief magistrate chief justice : it also signifies the best of a number of things. It is frequently used in composition.

References in periodicals archive ?
Toren 2000 for a more detailed discussion of chiefship and its
effective') and thus gains the daughter of the land chief and later the paramount chiefship which is voluntarily surrendered to him by the older man.
Fijian chiefship, Hocart argued, was concerned to bring about and to maintain prosperity and the story shows Biu to be an effective warrior and provider.
15] But there is no suggestion in the records that an ancestor of the NaRai who created the first paramount to hold the title Takalaigau had wrested the chiefship from an earlier incumbent who was the chief of another, possibly, indigenous people.
Fourthly, and given Ratu Tomasi's emphasis on his Bauan ancestor's descent through a woman who was daughter to a lands-people chief in Sawaieke country, it seems very possible that Ratu Damudamu made his claim on his grandfather as a vasu (sister's child, even if at several removes); the privilege of the vasu is to `take without asking' from the mother's people and if `grandfather Veidre' indeed held the title NaRai, as Ratu Tomasi's account suggests he did, then what he had to give was the paramount chiefship -- for only Narai can install a paramount in office, however he cannot be compelled to do so, except perhaps by the threat of superior force of arms.
When one analyses these records it becomes apparent that Fijian chiefship had retained its dual nature, that in their rise to power the war chiefs (Na Sau) had not yet managed to render hierarchy absolute, for, as I show below, it was still predicated on its antithesis -- equality between persons who relate to one another as cross-cousins across households, and within and across clans and other larger collectivities.
Further, all exchange relations are competitive and ultimately those of balanced reciprocity even while the rituals of chiefship render them as tributary and apparently unequal.