childhood


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Related to childhood: Childhood development
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Young David Hardy grew up in the house with this woman and as can well be imagined there was not much joy in his childhood.
More than any other person we remembered, this girl seemed to mean to us the country, the conditions, the whole adventure of our childhood.
A, lady--who had fed herself from childhood with the shadowy food of aristocratic reminiscences, and whose religion it was that a lady's hand soils itself irremediably by doing aught for bread,--this born lady, after sixty years of narrowing means, is fain to step down from her pedestal of imaginary rank.
He had been the husband of three wives, all long since dead; the father of twenty children, most of whom, at every age of childhood or maturity, had likewise returned to dust.
A want of information concerning my own was a source of unhappiness to me even during childhood.
She recalled her past kindness the kindness, the affection of sixteen years how she had taught and how she had played with her from five years old how she had devoted all her powers to attach and amuse her in health and how nursed her through the various illnesses of childhood.
On coming back a few days afterwards (for I did not consider my banishment perpetual), I found they had christened him 'Heathcliff': it was the name of a son who died in childhood, and it has served him ever since, both for Christian and surname.
Whatever this objection may be really worth, it cannot apply to Miss Garth, who has brought you both up from childhood.
Immoral, licentious, anarchical, unscientific -- call them by what names you will -- yet, from an aesthetic point of view, those ancient days of the Colour Revolt were the glorious childhood of Art in Flatland -- a childhood, alas, that never ripened into manhood, nor even reached the blossom of youth.
Instantly all the old fears and terrors of her childhood returned upon her.
First, the instinct of imitation is implanted in man from childhood, one difference between him and other animals being that he is the most imitative of living creatures, and through imitation learns his earliest lessons; and no less universal is the pleasure felt in things imitated.
More particularly is this the case with regard to my childhood, my golden childhood.

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