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Cite

To notify a person of a proceeding against him or her or to call a person forth to appear in court.

To make reference to a legal authority, such as a case, in a citation.

Cases, statutes, constitutions, treatises, and other similar authorities are cited to support a certain view of law on an issue. When writing a legal brief, an attorney may wish to strengthen his or her position by referring to cases that support what he or she is saying in order to persuade the court to make a ruling favorable for the client.

Cross-references

Precedent; Stare Decisis.

cite

v. 1) to make reference to a decision in another case to make a legal point in argument. 2) to give notice of being charged with a minor crime and a date for appearance in court to answer the charge rather than being arrested (usually given by a police officer). (See: citation)

cite

(Accuse), verb allege, blame, bring a charge, bring an action, call to account, censure, challenge, charge, complain, denounce, discredit, impeach, impute, incriminate, inform against, lodge a commlaint, make a complaint

cite

(State), verb advance, attest, authenticate, bring forward, certify, circumstantiate, document, enunciate, evidence, evince, exemplify, exhibit, express, give as example, illustrate, indicate, introduce as an example, maintain, make evident, make reference to, manifest, name, point to, predicate, present as proof, prove, quote, recite, refer to, refer to legal authorities, set forth, show, show evidence, show proof, specify, substantiate, use in support of propositions of law
Associated concepts: cite a case as precedence
See also: accuse, acknowledge, adduce, allege, allude, arraign, bear, blame, charge, complain, condemn, denounce, exemplify, extract, honor, illustrate, mention, order, posit, present, quote, recognize, refer, specify, summon
References in periodicals archive ?
Given these differences, courts treat unpublished opinions as second-class precedents in various ways--for example, by regarding them as citable only for "persuasive" value and not as precedents.
Fig share enables academic researchers to make all of their research outputs available in a citable, sharable and discoverable manner.
When Judge Kozinski ultimately moves in Hart from whether unpublished opinions are binding authority to whether they are citable, he departs from his earlier consideration of history, common law practice, and "persuasive precedent" and makes an argument that is wholly prudential.
189) In part for this reason, a vacated Arizona Court of Appeals opinion should be citable for its persuasive value in subsequent Arizona state court litigation, (190) even if the proposition for which the opinion is being cited was rejected by the Arizona Supreme Court when it vacated the opinion.
Farming out research to associations and colleges had allowed the NCCJ to produce citable results--several participants in the College Study, for example, addressed racial tensions.
This could be due to the fact that there may be more citable material, or less that is of little use in the field of sports economics.
Four indicators selected for Pakistan National Research Index (PNRI) are growth in number of PhDs, number of patents registered with Pakistan, citable documents, development and non-development expenditure on higher education.
The coverage comes with citable contents, details of the editorial board for every paper, indexing and ISI/impact factor rankings.
Alternatively, one could interpret the footnote as an expression of concern about the integrity of the appellate process and a warning to future Supreme Court litigants that efforts to affect the outcomes of their appeals by funding citable research are likely to fail.
The more common pattern is to have an intermediate appellate court that also issues citable opinions.
Even for knowledge that everyone knows the editors are going to want a citable source.
article is particularly impressive, given that it was published in 2002, 2 years into the sample period (meaning that it was a citable article in only 3 of the 5 years of data collection).