cite


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Cite

To notify a person of a proceeding against him or her or to call a person forth to appear in court.

To make reference to a legal authority, such as a case, in a citation.

Cases, statutes, constitutions, treatises, and other similar authorities are cited to support a certain view of law on an issue. When writing a legal brief, an attorney may wish to strengthen his or her position by referring to cases that support what he or she is saying in order to persuade the court to make a ruling favorable for the client.

Cross-references

Precedent; Stare Decisis.

cite

v. 1) to make reference to a decision in another case to make a legal point in argument. 2) to give notice of being charged with a minor crime and a date for appearance in court to answer the charge rather than being arrested (usually given by a police officer). (See: citation)

cite

(Accuse), verb allege, blame, bring a charge, bring an action, call to account, censure, challenge, charge, complain, denounce, discredit, impeach, impute, incriminate, inform against, lodge a commlaint, make a complaint

cite

(State), verb advance, attest, authenticate, bring forward, certify, circumstantiate, document, enunciate, evidence, evince, exemplify, exhibit, express, give as example, illustrate, indicate, introduce as an example, maintain, make evident, make reference to, manifest, name, point to, predicate, present as proof, prove, quote, recite, refer to, refer to legal authorities, set forth, show, show evidence, show proof, specify, substantiate, use in support of propositions of law
Associated concepts: cite a case as precedence
See also: accuse, acknowledge, adduce, allege, allude, arraign, bear, blame, charge, complain, condemn, denounce, exemplify, extract, honor, illustrate, mention, order, posit, present, quote, recognize, refer, specify, summon
References in periodicals archive ?
The promoters of La Cite de Mirabel saw a great potential for residential development at the interchange of Highway 15 and exit 28.
As with Perrault's library, it is too early to predict the true effectiveness of Paris's new Cite.
That report does not cite the 1986 CBD literature intervention study but the similarity of the two papers is notable.
In the weeks leading up to the conference, the CITE team will lead a series of Twitter chats focused on key topics of interest to the audience.
The above are potential reasons why authors might cite the book rather than the original article, but they do not mean that from a social perspective citing the book is welfare increasing.
Smith said at a City Hall press conference Tuesday that he will ask the city attorney to draft an ordinance that would contain an ``aiding and abetting'' section similar to that in a state anti-street racing law that allows authorities to cite spectators as well as drivers.
Continuing his attempt to explain the decline of Catholicism of Quebec since the 1960s, Gagnon cites Cardinal Ratzinger's references to the shipwreck of womens' religious communities in the province.
The statement cites an October 27, 1998 article by the Associated Press regarding Speth's conviction.
For instance, Ashton and Crocker (1987) cite numerous studies on teacher preparation to support their conclusion that coursework in education makes teachers more effective than coursework in their subject matter does.
If the author cites predominantly into one cluster, as is often the case, the interdisciplinary co-citation reaches out beyond the author's home cluster (see Figure 1).
The classical definition, which he quite often cites, is that America has been uniquely successful among advanced industrial societies because it lacks a feudal (status or hierarchy-based) past.