city

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Related to cities: cites, Capital cities

city

noun megalopolis, metropolis, metropolitan area, municipality, polis, urban district, urban place, urbs
Associated concepts: city attorney, city council, city court, city districts, city employee, city hall, city limits, city marrhal, city officer, city purpose, municipal corporations
See also: community

CITY, government. A town incorporated by that name. Originally, this word did not signify a town, but a portion of mankind who lived under the same government: what the Romans called civitas, and, the Greeks polis; whence the word politeia, civitas seu reipublicae status et administratio. Toull. Dr. Civ. Fr. 1. 1, t. 1, n. 202; Henrion de Pansey, Pouvoir Municipal, pp. 36, 37.

References in periodicals archive ?
Shanghai is now one of the world's fastest growing cities while Beijing is hurriedly transforming itself in anticipation of the 2008 Olympic Games.
The cities had the jobs, and new arrivals from the countryside provided the factories with cheap, plentiful labor.
For if as human beings we are to be reflective--in the manner I have proposed we understand that term--so that we might be formed as citizens, then we can see all our attempts to be the builders of earthly cities as expressions of a desire that structures all our intercourse and activity.
The analyses below do not depend on city-specific values for these parameters, and for simplicity, they are assumed to be the same for all cities.
Despite its public profligacy, Cincinnati ranked among the nation's largest cities at the turn of the 19th century--a gateway to the West and a thriving commercial center sustained by the Ohio River and the Miami-Erie canal.
3) Not many blocks away from these sumptuous apartments - in East and Central Harlem and well north into the Bronx and eastward to Brooklyn, from Bedford Stuyvesant to Brownsville - we find a million on public assistance, a population which by itself would constitute one of nation's ten largest cities.
Geographers and planners have long sought to understand this characteristic clumping of humans into towns and cities.
Despite what you might have heard, all is not lost in America's inner cities.
Cleveland has been drinking from the same gold-plated spigot that quenched the thirsty downtowns of many other cities - the public subsidies that have made welfare clients of their wealthiest denizens.
Because it has never been a big blue-collar town, Atlanta lacks a working-class presence that characterizes many cities.
Though trees are a fundamental building block of a healthy urban environment, nearly half of the cities surveyed do not have routine street-tree maintenance programs that are critical to the health of the urban forest.