clangor


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In the 1940s, the cavernous space echoed with the clangor of America's industrial might, as destroyers rolled down the ways, and the United States feverishly prepared for war.
Pause to examine a fresh albacore, and your mind's ear hears the clangor of fishing boats on Morro Bay.
First there was a raffle conducted by silhouettes then some gaga clangor and the deflection of not getting what I wanted probably never.
It will make you proud to be Catholic amid the clangor of talking heads and political/religious extremists.
A windblown tree isolated in a patch of parkland shakes its branches to the clangor of a mildly deranged piano composition, prompting the mind-bending thought that each individual branch might even have been provided with its own unique melody.
Hugo is lofty, and this falls with a hollow clangor on our ironic ears.
GARON ta2 = adoring, aground, clangor, frogman, groaner, paragon
other objects seen in the air; clashing armies or fleeing troops seen or heard in the air or on the ground; the horrible sound of shouting voices and the clangor of dashing arms" (63).
Yet the ear, it fully knows, By the twanging And the clanging, How the danger ebbs and flows:-- 60 Yes, [or Yet,] the ear distinctly tells, In the jangling And the wrangling, How the danger sinks and swells, By the sinking or the swelling in the anger of the bells-- 65 Of the bells-- Of the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, bells, bells-- In the clamor and the clangor of the bells.
THOSE WHO RECALL THE WAR between Vittorio Sgarbi, former undersecretary of the Italian culture ministry, and Francesco Bonami, director of visual arts for the 50th Venice Biennale [see Artforum, May 2002], may wonder what became of the clangor over Bonami's appointment: It ended with a whimper when Sgarbi was summarily booted from office last summer.
Saba's inversion of "dell'ombre per l'immenso impero" gives his line a Latinate, a Virgilian, clangor quite missing from the English.
of an engine, that his birth cry arises out of a clangor of sounds.