classic

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References in classic literature ?
In short, my dear sir, try the suaviter in modo (as we classical men say) before you commit yourself to the fortiter in re
Yet in the indulgence of a propensity so truly classical, it is not to be supposed that the restaurateur would lose sight of that intuitive discrimination which was wont to characterize, at one and the same time, his essais and his omelettes.
The lamp beat upon his face, and so intent was it and so still that it might have been that of a clear-cut classical statue, a personification of alertness and expectation.
In the first place, you are probably aware that two years ago I made a journey to South America--one which will be classical in the scientific history of the world?
For some reason it looked a very artificial lake; indeed, the whole scene was like a classical landscape with a touch of Watteau; the Palladian facade of the house pale in the moon, and the same silver touching the very pagan and naked marble nymph in the middle of the pond.
For the companion who is merely uncongenial in the mediaeval world becomes exasperating in the classical.
They were his father and mother, his brother the Reverend Felix--curate at a town in the adjoining county, home for the inside of a fortnight--and his other brother, the Reverend Cuthbert, the classical scholar, and Fellow and Dean of his College, down from Cambridge for the long vacation.
To even the little manliness his classical prototypes possessed, though, he can lay no claim whatever, being a listless effeminate noodle, on the shady side of forty.
Bohn's Classical Library), 1850; by Wharton, 1883 (see Greek version), S.
One of the hotels at Vevey, however, is famous, even classical, being distinguished from many of its upstart neighbors by an air both of luxury and of maturity.
Sir Henry followed suit with a verse out of the Old Testament, and something about Balbus building a wall, in Latin, whilst Good addressed the Queen of Night in a volume of the most classical bad language which he could think of.
Gringoire, who liked noble and classical comparisons, compared him in thought to the living tripod of Vulcan.

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