clerk

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Clerk

A person employed in an office or government agency who performs various tasks such as keeping records or accounts, filing, letter writing, or transcribing. One who works in a store and whose job might include working as a cashier, selling merchandise, or waiting on customers.

A law clerk is either a law student employed by a licensed attorney to do mundane legal tasks and learn the law in the process, or a licensed lawyer working for a judge to aid in the writing and research of the cases before the judge.

clerk

n. 1) an official or employee who handles the business of a court or a system of courts, maintains files of each case, and issues routine documents. Almost every county has a clerk of the courts or County Clerk who fulfills those functions, and most courtrooms have a clerk to keep records and assist the judge in the management of the court. 3) a young lawyer who assists a judge or a senior attorney in research and drafting of documents, usually for a year or two, and benefits in at least two ways: learning from the judge and enjoying association with the judge. Law clerks for judges, particularly on the Courts of Appeal and the Supreme Court, are chosen from among the top students graduating from law school. 2) a person who works in an office or a store who performs physical work such as filing, stocking shelves, or counter sales.

clerk

noun archivist, chronicler, copyist, court emmloyee, court official, court scribe, judicial administrator, juuicial assistant, judicial recorder, judicial secretary, office holder, office worker, official, prothonotary, recorder, record keeper, registrar, scriba, scribe, scrivener, secretary
Associated concepts: clerk of the county, clerk of the court, county clerk, papers filed with the clerk, town clerk
Foreign phrases: Errores scribentis nocere non debent. An error made by a clerk ought not to prejudice.

clerk

verb aid a judge, assist a judge, help a judge, work for a judge
See also: accountant, amanuensis, assistant

clerk

1 one who assists a solicitor. Formerly, if in training to become a solicitor, the assistant was known as an articled clerk.
2 a clerk to the justices in England or the clerk of court in Scotland is a legally qualified person who sits in court with lay justices to advise them on points of law. The clerk of the House is a senior official ofthe House of Commons.

CLERK, commerce, contract. A person in the employ of a merchant, who attends only to a part of his business, while the merchant himself superintends the whole. He differs from a factor in this, that the latter wholly supplies the place of his principal in respect to the property consigned to him. Pard. Dr. Com. n. 38, 1 Chit. Pract. 80; 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 1287.

CLERK, officer. A person employed in an office, public or private, for keeping records or accounts. His business is to write or register, in proper form, the transactions of the tribunal or body to which he belongs. Some clerks, however, have little or no writing to do in their offices, as, the clerk of the market, whose duties are confined chiefly to superintending the markets. In the English law, clerk also signifies a clergyman.

CLERK, eccl. law. Every individual, who is attached to the ecclesiastical state, and who has submitted to the ceremony of the tonsure, is a clerk.

References in classic literature ?
Here, likewise -- the germ of the wrinkle-browed, grizzly-bearded, careworn merchant -- we have the smart young clerk, who gets the taste of traffic as a wolf-cub does of blood, and already sends adventures in his master's ships, when he had better be sailing mimic boats upon a mill-pond.
Without further interruption, we reached the front office, where we found the clerk and the man in velveteen with the fur cap.
The name of Porthos produced its effect upon the clerks, who began to laugh; but Porthos turned sharply round, and every countenance quickly recovered its gravity.
I thought you and everybody else looked upon me only in the light of a poor clerk.
The clerk turned upon his heel, after making his very best bow.
On the following day M'Dougal convened the clerks, and read to them an extract from a letter from his uncle, Mr.
All the higher offices were gained through parliamentary influence, royalty had nothing to do now with them, and the subordinate clerks became, after a time, merely the running-gear of the machine; the most important considerations with them being to keep the wheels well greased.
But the transition from a commonplace nature to one that is richly endowed, demands always a more or less breakneck leap over a certain abyss which yawns threateningly below; and thus must the sudden change with the clerk strike the reader.
Dodson & Fogg was a dark, mouldy, earthy-smelling room, with a high wainscotted partition to screen the clerks from the vulgar gaze, a couple of old wooden chairs, a very loud-ticking clock, an almanac, an umbrella-stand, a row of hat-pegs, and a few shelves, on which were deposited several ticketed bundles of dirty papers, some old deal boxes with paper labels, and sundry decayed stone ink bottles of various shapes and sizes.
The other was his clerk, assistant, housekeeper, secretary, confidential plotter, adviser, intriguer, and bill of cost increaser, Miss Brass--a kind of amazon at common law, of whom it may be desirable to offer a brief description.
The clerk looked at him, but without the slightest interest.
The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner.