climactic


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Theoden (Bernard Hill), the bewitched King of Rohan who later leads a climactic battle at Helm's Deep.
Further observation into the climactic conditions of the Arctic region only reinforce the theory that the marked temperature rise in the region is slated to continue increasing at this rate.
Only Luke places the disputation between those so situated at the climactic moment: one calls to Jesus to aid his escape from the cross (a literal theology of glory), while the other accepts the cross and asks only to be remembered (23:39-42).
En route to that climactic moment, the film is careful to extol the supposed virtues of homosexuals as the suffering saints of bourgeois society.
Its climactic moment was the invitation to the assembled congregation to sign "A Spiritual Declaration on Climate Change," which included a commitment "to help reduce the threat of climate change through actions in our own lives, pressure on governments and industries, and standing in solidarity with those most affected by climate change.
Katahdin marks the climactic finale to the 2,160-mile northward trek of the Appalachian Trail.
A two-part unfolding page reveals the climactic moment when one of the contestants is so entranced in the passion of the moment he appears to take to the skies
In the tepid Broadway revival awkwardly staged by David Leveaux, none of the actors are especially well cast, though Lange pulls off the second act's climactic scene.
Ol'Man River would appeal to boys ages 10-14, sounding more difficult than it is with a nice climactic ending, whereas Smoke Gets in Your Eyes is a very lyrical, tasteful and linearly moving arrangement.
The climactic scene, in which Benoit rides in a sleigh with his drunken uncle and the body of a dead youth, resonates with Canadian cultural mythology, the snowstorm an indication of the tempestuous winds of change about to come.
The climactic "penis hanging" scene in Annika Larsson's video New Gravity, 2003, retraces the dark fringes of her earlier themes: pleasure from pain, erotic ritual, and a taste for sadism's aftermath.
The temptation is to downplay a fact that would otherwise distract from the climactic point of your book.