coworker

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The 24-year-old Filipina co-worker was said to be present with her 33-year-old countryman supervisor at a Dubai Metro station to meet a client in December.
Swift medical intervention helped save the life of the co-worker who underwent several surgeries after he was rushed to hospital.
First, scenarios cannot assess the source of discomfort evoked by interacting with a returning traveler; baseline discomfort from a handshake is predictably less than is assisting a co-worker who fainted, regardless of EVD risk.
This empowerment has helped co-workers feel appreciated and increased their level of ownership with new programs, initiatives and procedures.
A proposed amendment to the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill will mean individuals who expose wrongdoings by their employer will have protection from bullying or harassment by their co-workers, as well as by their employer as the law now stands.
The Co-worker Engagement Tool includes a short, non-anonymous survey that co-workers answer about him/herself and real-time individual and aggregate reports.
We share our knowledge with each other and the buddy system allows our new co-workers to gain experience from our existing co-workers - meaning that new starts are confident and competent.
There's no pressure for bosses to improve schedules and time-off benefits when you can replace longings for family and friends with other co-workers.
Workers involved in this study reported that they relied on close relationships with their clients and their co-workers to keep the environment safe and on a positive footing.
Company witnesses testified that the plaintiff constantly had problems with management and co-workers, which led to a series of escalating disciplinary sanctions ranging from warnings to denial of privileges to a suspension.
A worker is in conflict with a co-worker when the former is obstructed or irritated by the latter (Van de Vliert, 1997; for similar definitions, see Deutsch, 1973; Rahim, 1992; Rubin, Pruitt, & Kim, 1994).
Knowledge of openly gay or lesbian co-workers was common, as was discussion of issues relating to gay, lesbian, or bisexual individuals both in and out of the workplace.