Coast

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COAST. The margin of a country bounded by the sea. This term includes the natural appendages of the territory which rise out of the water, although they are not of sufficient firmness to be inhabited or fortified. Shoals perpetually covered with water are not, however, comprehended under the name of coast. The small islands, situate at the mouth of the Mississippi, composed of earth and trees drifted down by the river, which are not of consistency enough to support the purposes of life, and are uninhabited, though resorted to for shooting birds, were held to form a part of the coast. 5 Rob. Adm. R. 385. (c).

References in periodicals archive ?
Our country is one big Boracay, but locals are not able to enjoy the coastlines because some greedy people are restricting their access.
Things have come to a head, the group said, urging the district administration to assume its responsibilities over the substantial degrading, alteration, and destruction of the coastline.
We fully intend for this study to be used to implement projects that will result in a more resilient coastline throughout the Great Lakes and a more strategic expenditure of state and federal funds.
We have continued to invest in our coastline over the years through projects such as the Seafront Master Plan for Whitley Bay and I'm very optimistic about the future for North Tyneside.
The regional names of the land south of Le Testu's 310-degree coastline are listed in the Table 1.
Africa's relatively small share might look surprising given its land area, but can be explained by it having a much more regular coastline that has far fewer indentations such as inlets, bays or gulfs compared to other regions.
Britain has three Border Force vessels to patrol more than 7,000 miles of coastline.
The designated heritage coast comprises over 14 km of the natural, undeveloped and restored sections of coastline of East Durham and South Sunderland.
The study covered the natural geographical and human changes the Dubai coastline witnessed, from Al Mamzar Beach Park to the Dubai Waterfront Project and the Arabian Canal.
And 94% of the 3,342 miles of coastline considered to be "pristine" in the original survey in 1965 is now protected, as it is either owned by the National Trust or is designated as an important natural area in the planning system.
The coastline encapsulates the beating heart of what the National Trust is about - looking after places of natural beauty rich in wildlife.
Helen Ghosh, the Trust's directorgeneral, said: "Over 50 years the extraordinary generosity and support of people from across the world has enabled us to buy some of the most beautiful, dramatic and diverse coastline on these islands enabling people to enjoy them and protecting them from development for generations to come.