cognomen


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cognomen

noun appelation, appellative, byname, byword, denomination, designation, name, nickname, sobriquet, style
See also: call, expression, sobriquet, term, title

COGNOMEN. A Latin word, which signifies a family name. The praenomen among the Romans distinguished the person, the nomen, the gens, or all the kindred descended from a remote common stock through males, while the cognomen denoted the particular family. The agnomen was added on account of some particular event, as a further distinction. Thus, in the designation Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus, Publius is the proenomen, Cornelius is the nomen, Scipio the cognomen, and Africanus the agnomen. Vicat. These several terms occur frequently in the Roman laws. See Cas. temp. Hardw. 286; 1 Tayl. 148. See Name; Surname.

References in periodicals archive ?
She appointed as her executors in the following order, her son-in-law, Giovanni Ystrigo (whose cognomen suggests that he was Latin), his wife and her daughter, Anica, and lastly Cali's son, Matteo.
19, 24 et 26) qui ne sont connus que par leur cognomen, et encore convient-il d'interpreter avec prudence l'absence de gentilice.
Se trata de Venonio--se desconoce el praenomen y el cognomen, si lo tuvo--, a cuya obra hace referencia Ciceron en mas de una ocasion, pero de la cual solamente tenemos un fragmento sobre las tribus de Servio Tulio que nos transmite Dionisio de Halicarnaso (31).
Poco cabe decir del cognomen del personaje mencionado en el texto.
Yet it was they, as survivors and mature poets, along with the relative novice Propertius (birth date uncertain, but no older than ten years by 44), who were the first to insert his honorific cognomen into Roman poetry.
Out of traditionalism or other motifs escaping us, some cognomen betraying an Illyrian origin surface in the case of romanized Illyrian families.
It has the important advantage of producing names that are onomastically `normal' and consistent with the practice of using only a praenomen and single cognomen for each of the Roman officials mentioned in the text.
records that from infancy Octavian was given the cognomen Thurinus, in
El Noroeste se define asi como uno de los espacios en que el poder romano atraviesa los limites de la ecumene, simbolicamente representados por el acceso a un mundo desconocido donde la memoria se pierde y en el que solo penetra el heroe que incorpora la accion y asume el nombre de los conquistados como cognomen, Bruto Galaico.
Hence the Sogdian employment of the identical cognomen guarantees the relative antiquity of this Manichaean "rewriting" of Genesis 3-4.
220; that his cognomen was Silanus seems to be indicated by the ass's head on his coinage.
Johnson, was that of "hypocrite renverse"; the cognomen referred to Swift's habit of studiously presenting his worst face to the world, seemingly so as to solicit unfounded accusations against his morality and character.