colloquial


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those calling for this move - which has spread to television shows, advertising material and even the columns of some newspapers - are saying that their goal is not to undermine Arabic, at a time when those opposing the idea believe that the introduction of the colloquial language to the primary school curricula aims to challenge the Arabic language as the language of religion.
The poets themselves insist that artistic necessity, not politics, governs their choice of language; the colloquial language or "common tongue" is the language of the self and of the conscience; it is the language in which we really live and in which we form our outlook on the world, they argue.
95), has produced a valuable and wellpresented guide to colloquial and idiomatic Welsh.
The problem with translation by a nonnative speaker,'' said Monica Matulich, company spokeswoman for Cyrsh Technologies Corporation, a Woodland Hills-based translation software developer, ``is that they translate according to the way they learned the language in school, which is not necessarily the colloquial or best usage.
One is the problem of the use of colloquial dialogue.
In poems such as this that look outward, Vest is pointed, ironic, sometimes colloquial, always brief.
A particular problem was collecting the colloquial spoken form of the language as used in everyday speech, and not the classical standard forms found in read speech.
Readers should have a level of mastery of modern colloquial Japanese equivalent to that of intermediate level college course work, including basic grammar and an understanding of passive and causative verbs.
For "Halte-stelle" is not only colloquial for bus stop; it also literally means "stopping place" or "holding this place," alluding to the way in which a photograph arrests, or freezes, a fleeting moment in the temporal continuum.
No wonder America has gone gaga over the confident, colloquial crusaders for women's soccer.
Incidentally, the word is that Hughes has been known to appear under the stage name of Bobby Valentine, from a colloquial and formal combination of his christian names.
As with her own colloquial one-liners that end various units or chapters ("Play it again, Pamphilia"; "if they be two, they are two so, as the sides of a Mobius strip are two'; "O femina certa"), so her own paradoxical circling of a text arises from the culture of the 1990s and nowhere else.