collusion


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Collusion

An agreement between two or more people to defraud a person of his or her rights or to obtain something that is prohibited by law.

A secret arrangement wherein two or more people whose legal interests seemingly conflict conspire to commit Fraud upon another person; a pact between two people to deceive a court with the purpose of obtaining something that they would not be able to get through legitimate judicial channels.

Collusion has often been used in Divorce proceedings. In the past some jurisdictions made it extremely difficult for a couple to obtain a divorce. Often a "sweetheart" agreement would take place, whereby a husband or wife would commit, or appear to commit, Adultery or other acts that would justify a divorce. The public policy against collusive divorces is based on the idea that such actions would conflict with the effective administration by society of laws on marriage and divorce and would undermine marriage as a stabilizing force in society.

Virtually all jurisdictions have adopted no-fault divorce statutes or laws that allow a couple to obtain a divorce without traditional fault grounds, such as adultery or cruel and inhuman treatment. Because of this development, collusive divorces should diminish in number, since it will no longer be necessary for persons seeking a divorce to resort to such measures.

The fundamental societal objection to collusion is that it promotes dishonesty and fraud, which, in turn, undermines the integrity of the entire judicial system.

collusion

n. where two persons (or business entities through their officers or other employees) enter into a deceitful agreement, usually secret, to defraud and/or gain an unfair advantage over a third party, competitors, consumers or those with whom they are negotiating. Collusion can include secret price or wage fixing, secret rebates, or pretending to be independent of each other when actually conspiring together for their joint ends. It can range from small-town shopkeepers or heirs to a grandma's estate, to gigantic electronics companies or big league baseball team owners. (See: fraud)

collusion

noun abetment, act of working together, agreement, agreement for fraud, alliance, association, cabal, chicanery, coadjuvancy, coagency, collaboration, combination for fraud, combined operation, complicity, complot, concert, concord, concurrence, confederacy, conjunction, conlusio, connivance, conspiracy, contrivance, contriving, cooperation, cooperation for fraud, counterplot, covin, deceit, deceitful agreement, deceitful compact, deceitfulness, deception, duplicity, foul play, fraud, fraudulence, guile, hoax, illegal pact, intrigue, intriguery, joint effort, joint planning, junction, knavery, league, liaison, participation, participation in fraud, perfidy, plotting, praevaricatio, schemery, scheming, secret association, secret fraudulent understanding, secret unnerstanding, secret understanding for fraud, synergism, treachery, trickery, underhand dealing, underplot, union
Associated concepts: collusion in divorcing a spouse, colluuion in obtaining the grounds of a divorce, collusion in procurement of a judgment, collusion to create diversity of citizenship, collusive action, collusive effort, collusive suit, connivance, conspiracy
See also: bad faith, bribery, cabal, coaction, confederacy, connivance, conspiracy, contribution, contrivance, deceit, fraud, machination, plot

collusion

a deceitful or unlawful agreement. In England it is not a bar to an action of divorce. In Scotland it is still a defence to an action of divorce.

COLLUSION, fraud. An agreement between two or more persons, to defraud a person of his rights by the forms of law, or to obtain an object forbidden by law; as, for example, where the husband and wife collude to obtain a divorce for a cause not authorized by law. It is nearly synonymous with @covin. (q.v.)
     2. Collusion and fraud of every kind vitiate all acts which are infected with them, and render them void. Vide Shelf. on Mar. & Div. 416, 450; 3 Hagg. Eccl. R. 130, 133; 2 Greenl. Ev. Sec. 51; Bousq. Dict. de Dr. mot Abordage.

References in periodicals archive ?
When Republicans released their findings, though, Schiff did not mention collusion, choosing instead to accuse the majority of cutting short the investigation and placing "the interests of protecting the president over protecting the country.
From a cursory glance at the content of the stories revolving around the existence/non-existence of collusion, it is clear that left-leaning news organizations are less active than right-leaning organizations in discussing potential collusion.
The CPC must not give up the effort to document the case of horizontal price collusion, which appears blatantly obvious to consumers when there are marked changes in the international price of oil.
There is no cartel operation and there is no collusion.
We have recently brought into effect the provisions in the Competition Act that criminalize collusion and impose jail terms of up to ten years on directors and employees found guilty thereof," Minister Patel said.
He said: "This report is one of the most damning expositions of state collusion in mass murder that has ever been published.
The factory in collusion with other firms raised the sugar price up to 70 som every year since May to October and asked introduction of duties up to 30% for imported sugar, except for sugar from Belarus.
The alleged Spain/Portugal and Russia/Qatar collusion, which was published in The Sunday Times was a fabrication, of that I am certain today.
The electronic auction will discourage collusion and ensure transparency," said the official.
The petition for an indefinite injunction is the proper remedy sought until the issue and allegation of collusion and illegal anti-competitive behavior is resolved," he said in an interview.
Collusion sustainability with optimal punishments and detection lags, with an application to a Cournot game
Both in the United States and the European Union there have been significant difficulties in the enforcement of laws prohibiting collusion when companies engage in tacit collusion wherein, without communication with each other, they exploit their interdependence achieved by collective dominance in order to establish parallelism resulting in anticompetitive effects.