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References in classic literature ?
I feel no disposition to be satirical, when the trapper's coat emits the odor of musquash even; it is a sweeter scent to me than that which commonly exhales from the merchant's or the scholar's garments.
Even Mahomet, though many may scream at his name, had a good deal more to live for, aye, and to die for, than they have commonly.
He asked, "What methods were used to cultivate the minds and bodies of our young nobility, and in what kind of business they commonly spent the first and teachable parts of their lives?
Her hard rule made her very unpopular, and it was commonly believed that she had made away with Prince Alphege.
To all this conversation Don Quixote was listening very attentively, and sitting up in bed as well as he could, and taking the hostess by the hand he said to her, "Believe me, fair lady, you may call yourself fortunate in having in this castle of yours sheltered my person, which is such that if I do not myself praise it, it is because of what is commonly said, that self-praise debaseth; but my squire will inform you who I am.
When they happen, they commonly amount to revolutions and dismemberments of empire.
The first, that simulation and dissimulation commonly carry with them a show of fearfulness, which in any business, doth spoil the feathers, of round flying up to the mark.
which are commonly badly designed, inartistic in color, and ill-
He adds that they were commonly carpeted and lined within with well-wrought embroidered mats, and were furnished with various utensils.
And when they are housed, they will work, in summer, commonly, stripped and barefoot, but in winter substantially clothed and shod.
In that part of the western division of this kingdom which is commonly called Somersetshire, there lately lived, and perhaps lives still, a gentleman whose name was Allworthy, and who might well be called the favourite of both nature and fortune; for both of these seem to have contended which should bless and enrich him most.
One of the main purposes of these lectures is to give grounds for the belief that the distinction between mind and matter is not so fundamental as is commonly supposed.