paralysis

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And these ten years of the UPA Government is nothing but a very sorry saga of complete inaction, complete paralysis in decision-making and the results are therefore all of us to see," he added.
The child, who can only be referred to as MB for legal reasons, suffers from the severest form of spinal muscular atrophy - an incurable and progressively worsening condition leading to complete paralysis.
The child, who can only be referred to as MB for legal reasons, suffers from the most severe form of spinal muscular atrophy - an incurable and progressive condition leading to complete paralysis.
The child, who can only be referred to as MB for legal reasons, suffers from spinal muscular atrophy, an incurable and progressively worsening condition leading to complete paralysis.
The boy suffers from spinal muscular atrophy - an incurable and progressively worsening condition leading to complete paralysis.
Furthermore, exercise is not commonly advocated because of the limited ability to exercise individuals with complete paralysis," Dr.
Mr Dale, aged 87, was hit with a piece of timber, inflicting a number of serious injuries including a fractured spine which resulted in complete paralysis.
In a matter of hours there was a rapid onset of symptoms leading to complete paralysis.
Students' disabilities range from mild learning disabilities to nearly complete paralysis caused by degenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis.
The symptoms of MS include, abnormal fatigue, impaired vision, loss of balance and muscle coordination, slurred speech, tremors, stiffness, bladder and bowel problems, difficulty walking, short-term memory loss, mood swings, and in severe cases, partial or complete paralysis.
Targeted disabilities are a subset of disabilities that the EEOC, as a matter of policy, has identified for special emphasis, and include deafness, blindness, missing extremities, partial or complete paralysis, epilepsy, severe intellectual disability, psychiatric disability, and dwarfism.
He told BBC News that they've seen people who now have the ability to move their fingers where they have had several years of complete paralysis.

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