comprehendere

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5, 127-8: "Hinc dicit Commentator super IIIum De anima: 'Intellectus qui in nobis est duas habet actiones, quarum una est comprehendere intellecta, alia est extrahere formas et denudare a materiis, quod nihil aliud est nisi facere eas intellectas in actu postquam erant in potentia.
Non solum quia etsi quorumdam excellentium accidentium anime bonitatem possibile sit pluribus hominum inesse absque doctrina non tamen totius scientiam absque doctrina comprehendere esse possibile .
The etymology of incomprehensible, like that of immediate, is instructive: comprehend derives from the Latin comprehendere, to grasp mentally, from com, together in mind, mentally + prehendere, to seize, to grasp.
Finally, he is unable to describe Circe's beauty: "there is no language which can encompass her beauty, for whatever I say will be too little" (nulla vox est quae formam eius possit comprehendere, nam quidquid dixero, minus erit 126,14).
The word "comprehend," for example, derived from the Latin comprehendere, meaning "to grasp," invokes feelings of absoluteness in our society, as its relative, "comprehensive," invokes the feeling of "including all," though the best definition of the word is "widespread.
So I conclude with a little bastardized Texanized Latin: sed possum explicare, non sed possum comprehendere.
Hominum enim memoria numquam tam stabilis tamque firma est ut illa omnia comprehendere et semper tenere valeant" (21-22).
fundati possimus comprehendere cum omnibus sanctis quae sit